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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  December 30, 2017 7:00am-10:00am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and jon kay. a beatle, a bee gee and a ballerina lead the way in the queen's new year honours. # twist and shout! # twist and shout. fab four drummer ringo starr becomes sir ringo. it's saturday ‘knight fever‘ for bee gees singer barry gibbs, who has dedicated the honour to his late brothers maurice and robin. and strictlyjudge darcey bussell is made a dame, saying she's humbled by the honour. good morning, it is saturday the 30th of december. the government's infrastructure adviser, lord adonis, quits as he delivers a scathing verdict on theresa may's plan for brexit. we'll speak to him just after 8 o'clock. yesterday, it was the snow causing chaos.
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today further warnings are in place across parts of the uk. good morning. ice is the main issue for parts of northern england and scotla nd for parts of northern england and scotland this morning but if anything it turns milder today ahead of some windy weather from storm dyla n of some windy weather from storm dylan coming tonight. all of the details in the next 15 minutes. in sport, australia captain steve smith — holds england at bay. he scores yet another century. and it helped launch sir david attenborough‘s career and has given us plenty of magical tv moments. we'll look back at 60 years of the bbc‘s natural history unit, and what the future holds for it. good morning. first, our main story. the former beatles drummer, ringo starr, barry gibb of the bee gees and the former deputy prime minister nick clegg have all been knighted in the new year honours list. stars from the world of sport who are recognised include the wales and lions rugby union captain, sam warburton and the world cup—winning england cricket
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captain heather knight, who both receive an obe. our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba has more details. # twist and shout! # twist and shout. more than 50 years after beatlemania, the fab four‘s drummer has been honoured with a knighthood... # what would you do if i sang... ..recognising ringo starr's half—a—century—long contribution to music. # i get by with a little help from my friends. # tragedy! former bee gee barry gibb said he was humbled and very proud to be made sir barry. # with no—one to love you, you're going nowhere. war horse author and long—time children's laureate michael morpurgo, who too has been made a knight, he hopes his award highlights the importance of literature for young people. reading is a great bastion against stupidity and bigotry and ignorance.
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it is the greatest weapon we have, really. and the greatest assistance we can give them is to make them readers. strictlyjudge darcey bussell, who has occasionally performed on the program too, to is made a dame. i'm dicky roper. i'm the night manager. those being made cbes, the next highest level of award, include actor hugh laurie for services to drama and best—selling riders authorjilly cooper. absolutely knocked out. knocked — i was thrilled. i couldn't believe it. i mean, suddenly to get a letter, you know, and i think "ooh, god, it's a bill, a gas bill or something". and it's this heavenly thing, saying "you're a cbe". it's wonderful. # i've got to run away. singer and campaigner mark almond is made an obe for services to arts and culture.
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musician and producer wiley, known as the ‘godfather of grime‘, is made an mbe. commentator: pass to warburton. brilliant catch by the captain! in the world of sport, sam warburton, who has captained wales and the british lions, is made an obe. most of those being honoured are ordinary people doing extraordinary work, like efe ezekiel, who acts as a mentorfor young people. of course, young people are everything to me. they‘re — i‘m passionate about them and passionate their life, their well—being and their welfare, so for me to be recognised for my passion is one of the greatest honours ever, so i‘m in complete gratitude and appreciation. the majority of honours do go to people who are not in the public eye but who have given exceptional service. and in 2018, the honours committee say they will be looking to particularly recognise individuals who were involved in the response to, and the aftermath of, the london and manchester terror attacks
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and the fire at grenfell tower. we‘ll be speaking to the youngest recipient of the british empire medal at 8:20 and to the author michael morpurgo, who has been knighted, just after 9:00. wintry weather will continue to dominate the weekend for many parts of the uk, with the met office issuing a yellow warning for ice in northern regions. the worst of the snow fell yesterday across northern england and scotland where roads were closed. flights at glasgow airport were also temporarily suspended. the rac has warned that driving conditions will continue to prove difficult. that can tell us what to expect. good morning! snow yesterday, ice today. that is the rough story, it has been a difficult festive series
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of full—time for troubling, we went see as many scenes through today is that if you are on the move this morning parts of scotland and northern england especially, and widespread icy conditions out there, fog is well on the hills and later this morning into the afternoon we will see snow returning to the scottish mountains but nowhere near as prolific as it has been a recent days at over the next 3a hours with what the problems of snow forced problems with winds, storm dylan is brewing in the atlantic, it has been named by the irish weather service, it will produce severe gales later that night into the morning in northern ireland and to those on the move tomorrow morning to other scotland, northern england and north wales, they bare the brunt of winds gusting 60— 70 miles an hour. a full update on that in the next 30 minutes. the former labour minister, lord adonis, has stepped down from his role as the government‘s infrastructure advisor, blaming theresa may‘s handling of brexit. he says he will "relentlessly" oppose the eu withdrawal bill in the house of lords. let‘s get more detail from our political correspondent emma va rdy who is in our london newsroom.
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the timing of this is interesting, isn‘t it? he has been a key character really within the government. yes, ever since the eu referendum lord adonis has been an outspoken critic of brexit, he has launched a number of attacks on the government over the way in which it has taken the uk art of the single market and the customs union. to some degree his resignation is no surprise. his resignation letter is much of the same, a real thai raid against the government is handling against the government is handling against brexit. in it he says theresa may is a lying with ukip and the hard right. so, will damage theresa may? it is the second such resignation in less than one month, we saw alan milburn resigned, the head of the social mobility commission, so it could make it harderfor her to say commission, so it could make it harder for her to say that she is able to create cross—party
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co—operation in the centre ground. there are those on the labor and lib dem benches have praised lord adonis ‘s principled stance on brexit. there are others within the conservative party who said his differences with the government so great, his resignation was long overdue. number 10 says hejumped before he was pushed. there is a sense of an ability about this, but he has been such a staunch remain all this time but perhaps it is no surprise he has now come to this decision. thank you indeed. and we‘ll be speaking to lord adonis at 8:10 this morning. the white house has said the world is watching how iranian authorities respond to anti—government protests in several cities. in a statement, it said iranians were fed up with the regime‘s corruption and its squandering of the nation‘s wealth to fund terrorism abroad. the us state department condemned the arrests of protesters yesterday. thousands of people are said to have joined demonstrations in cities throughout the country. severalfamilies
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several families who left homeless by the grenfell tower fire has not received extra money but was promised to them by the council to help cover the cost of christmas. 0ral borough of kensington and chelsea has apologised, saying it made a mistake after nearly 20 households promised relief missed out. younger people will enjoy the biggest "inheritance boom" of any post—war generation — that‘s according to the think tank the resolution foundation which analyses living standards. those born in the ‘80s will have to wait for the windfall, though — the study estimates that the average age that millennials will inherit something will be 6! years old. here‘s more from our business correspondent joe lynam. young people aged between 17 and 35 hoping to get the housing ladder could be set to inherit a lot of money from their parents. but it may come too late for some. according to the resolution foundation, the value of inheritances is set to double over the next 20 years, thanks to baby boomers aged between 50 and 70 leaving behind expensive property.
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but the think tank says the average age someone inherits is now 61, meaning too late for many of today‘s house hunters. across the piece, theirfinancial situation, their living standards picture for millenials is quite concerning. they‘re earning less than those 15 — or 10 or 15 years before them were at the same age, they are much less likely to own a home, and while they may be saving into a pension, it is much less likely to be one of those gold—plated final salary pensions, so in the round, quite a concerning picture for far too many millenials today. so, 17— to 35—year—olds inheriting more money than any previous generation will only be able to use it in their old age, or by passing it onto their own grandchildren. if the cold weather has got you thinking about summer sunshine, there‘s a warning today from the consumer group which? that holiday firms may be misleading consumers. many tour operators promote money—off deals, providing travellers book by a certain date.
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but a study found that half the holidays advertised were the same price — or even cheaper — after the offer expired. the firms involved have all denied misleading their customers. commercial broadcasters, including channel 4 and itv, are to receive an extra 60 million pounds from the government to increase the range of children‘s television programmes in the uk. the money, left over from the last bbc licence fee settlement, will pay for half the costs of original shows. ministers say they want to see greater variety in a market dominated by the bbc. shall we see some cute turtles? as ever! volunteers have released thousands of baby turtles into the sea off west mexico. it‘s part of a project to protect the endangered 0live ridley hatchlings, whose numbers have fallen sharply in recent years — largely due to poachers. it‘s hoped the creatures will return to the beach in around 30 years to lay their own eggs.
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it looks like a race, doesn‘t it? go! the next generation. that is then coming back? fast forward 30 yea rs, then coming back? fast forward 30 years, it is what they will look like. remembering the same beach after 30 years. i can‘t even remember the same road after 30 yea rs. remember the same road after 30 years. y live? it is 7:12 am, that will keep us up—to—date with weather inafew will keep us up—to—date with weather in a few minutes. as we‘ve been hearing, the list of new year‘s honours has been revealed and one of those to receive a cbe is martin green, the man responsible for organising hull‘s year as the uk capital of culture. we‘ll speak to martin in a couple of minutes. first, here‘s our arts correspondent colin paterson with a look back at hull‘s year in the spotlight. capital of culture —— capital of culture started its year as capital of culture with a magical fireworks,
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a crowd told me how thrilled they were. honestly you put some money into that, it makes london look like nothing. the opening event turned joint buildings into screen showing the history of the city. come on, come to hull. they were off, at least one cultural events took place every day, and is now at the end of the gear, people don‘t want it to be over. i've lived here for 73 years. has there ever been a year like this? never. the most exciting. it was fabulous. more than 1 million people saw the blade, a giant wind turbine turned into a 75 metre sculpture. so popular a permanent home has been found for it. i wished to communicate with you transformed the housing estate into a work of art. and katy perry visited for radio one‘s big weekend. there was a lwa ys radio one‘s big weekend. there was always on the entertaining about the huge american star saying hello to
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somewhere unlikely. let's go, hull! she didn‘t disappoint. the turner prize was held in two and any seat and listed the local primary school as critics. it looks like a potato. but there are those who think chances have been missed and worry about the future of grassroots art in the city. small community theatres group and the like, and i feel they have been slightly overlooked. so where does hull go from here to try to build on the momentum, the company who ran 2017 01’ momentum, the company who ran 2017 or continue to put on events. we still want to be ambitious and groundbreaking and do things which can track international media so we will do fewer things but i don‘t think there will be any less significant. hull had always been the city at the end of the line. 2017 it became a destination of choice. and the man responsible for hull‘s cultural year, martin greenjoins us now from our edinburgh studio.
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we will talk about why you are in edinburgh ina we will talk about why you are in edinburgh in a moment, but first congratulations. hard as it feel to have those three letters after your name? i am totally chuffed. to have recognition for doing the job you love is extraordinary, and more importantly, i take it as a national recognition for the city of hull and all the people who have taken part and really turned out and supported what has been a fabulous year of change for the city. a mantle to ta ke change for the city. a mantle to take on, to transform a city, or at least projected into the spotlight. what are the highlights being for you, in terms of the year of culture, the city of culture for huu? culture, the city of culture for hull? the key highlight has been the people of the city. the whole year has been owned by them. they have participated. we have had 2500 volu nteers participated. we have had 2500 volunteers working with us. we have worked with 55,000 young people, in 101 schools. it has been a really
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people based experience, of them really finding and celebrating the voice of the city. on top of that there has been the events from local artists, the extraordinary year that the ferens art gallery put on, up to the ferens art gallery put on, up to the showbiz of bbc radio one‘s big weekend, and a wonderful turner prize, where we have seen some of the biggest audiences for the turner prize ever. what would you say, if somebody hadn‘t been to hull ray couple of years, say they last went in 2014, if they came back now, what would be the biggest difference they would be the biggest difference they would notice? this city has had a massive makeover by the city council, in its public realm. it has refurbished the gallery. it has refurbished the gallery. it has refurbished the gallery. it has refurbished the new theatre. in legacy, they have a £27 million programme to refurbish the maritime heritage. lots to see in the future. iam heritage. lots to see in the future. i am particularly thrilled, also, at
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the leader of the council and john pie well, being honoured today with obes, pie well, being honoured today with 0bes, because city ‘s five or fail from great government and this is a city council which has taken some bold decisions in what are very hard times. you will find a great city reborn with great energy, and again, brilliant people. we are seeing pictures of the start, when it was all announced and hull came a city of culture. for you, what were the biggest challenges? you have expectations, you have dreams, but they are not always easy to achieve. no, and the key thing starts with being able to afford what you want to do. we were able to raise a lot of money locally and through the national lottery and the government, and that really allowed us to have ambitious dreams. so without opening event, yes, we did fireworks, because who doesn‘t love a fireworks? but that seven—day projection piece by sean mcallister, a wonderful documentary filmmaker, 342,000 people went through that over seven days. i think that was a
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moment where i stood there and thought, i think we are onto something here. there is an alchemy when culture and place comes together and i think if the approved something once again it is how important culture is to the lifeblood of our cities, howard springs people together and how it helps people come together and express themselves. —— how it brings people together. i have lots of other and other cities have been watching us. coventry is taking the baton in a couple of years. what advice would you give to the team behind that now? it is really simple. do it your way. hull behind that now? it is really simple. do it yourway. hull did it its own way. hull has an individual, unique personality, as to all cities. the main thing is that look to anybody else for any blueprint or any way that it is done. it is to do it your way, with your voice and your stories. and i wish them all
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great luck. hull has had a great time of it this year. we have three more yea rs time of it this year. we have three more years left, a great legacy plan, it is all in place. everything feels good and we are really looking forward to coventry in a couple of yea rs. forward to coventry in a couple of years. yet you are in edinburgh talking to us this morning. getting ready for hogmanay, i understand? yes, i know! ironwork of on a side project in edinburgh. it is the 25th year of hogmanay in its current incarnation, and the city council and organisers have given it a makeover and very flatteringly they ask me to be part of that. we are preparing a street party for 75,000 people. there is only one hogmanay, it is in edinburgh, and we are very excited about my night stop it will bea excited about my night stop it will be a great night. 0ne. excited about my night stop it will be a great night. one. martin green, cbe, you have licence to celebrate to your hearts content up through hogmanay and beyond. thank you to talking to us, and congratulations. thank you. what a charming man. yes, you can see how happy years. it is a
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shame we cannot give hull as a city some sort of big award. well, it could city of culture. and it is thriving. let‘s check in with the weather. matt? good morning. if you are on the move this weekend we still have a few weather problems on the way. not as many as we have had recently. it will be turning blustery tonight, but turning milder across the country in general. temperatures already around 30 in the southern counties of england. further north, temperatures still out, if not below freezing. if you are about to head out across parts of scotland and northern england, there is a widespread risk of ice to get us through the coming hours. this then fog over the higher ground. the rain in northern ireland will be spreading into south—west scotland as we go into the morning. that will turn into snow again over the higher ground. you sleet and snow that we
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have seen across the far north of england will ease away. the mist and fog will lift away and it will brighten up. a few showers towards the south—west, and especially the channel islands this morning. england and wales will have a primarily dry and right day. blustery, but milder than of late. heavy, thundery showers. 0ne blustery, but milder than of late. heavy, thundery showers. one to showers into northern england in the afternoon. that randolph sleet and hail snow will give us another covering of snow over the hills, followed by sunshine, and then heavy and wintry showers. but for most people, temperatures up on what they have been. as we go into tonight, watching this. this is the development of storm dylan, named by the irish weather service, bringing widespread gales and severe gales, affecting other parts of the mainland uk as we head into new year‘s eve. we will take you through tonight to get there. rain will be a feature across the south. spreading
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across all parts, in fact, eventually turning to snow as it hits the grampians later in the night. these are the temperatures as we go into the start of new year‘s eve. for most people, temperatures will be above where they have team but they will be frosty and icy in the far north. for those on the move tomorrow, travel disruption is possible. these are the areas where the winds will be strongest. 60— 70 mile an hour gust, at their worst in the morning. snow over the higher ground. brighter conditions developing but then showers develop in the west, sunshine and showers throughout new year‘s eve, for northern ireland as well. temperatures not 1 million northern ireland as well. temperatures not1 million miles off today‘s values, but factoring in those strong winds it will feel rather cold across parts of scotland and england. staying breezy into the evening, and as we hit midnight to ring in the new year, the fireworks will be going off and temperatures will be going off and temperatures will be going off and temperatures will be dropping. reasonably cool, nothing desperately cool ——
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desperately unusual, but take something waterproof in a matter where you are because those prolific areas could reach eastern areas at times. the rain to begin with across the channel islands and the far south—east, if anything, the channel islands and the far south—east, ifanything, new the channel islands and the far south—east, if anything, new year‘s day, a great day to getting out and clearing the head, taking a walk. some wintry showers in the north and west but sunny spells as well. that wind will play havoc with my golf walls new year‘s day. that wind will play havoc with my golf walls new year's day. it will be fine. it might help with your slice. the cheek of that. see you later. in november, we told you about a group of school children from kidderminster, who have become pen pals with elderly residents living at a nearby care home. after five months of correspondence, the children have been able to put faces to the people behind the letters. 0ur reporter, ali fortescue went along to meet them. signed, sealed, and this time it is
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being handed over. we are going to see our penpals and i am really excited. it is an unlikely friendship, but with just one mile and 80 years between them, jasmine and 80 years between them, jasmine and her school friends are finally making the trip up to barchester ca re making the trip up to barchester care homes to meet their penpals for the very first time. that is very nice, isn‘t it? that is lovely. the very first time. that is very nice, isn't it? that is lovely. have you got something to give, james? we have been writing to the residence here sincejuly now, and the children have been loving receiving replies as well as writing about events which have happened in their lives. more than 400 letters have been sent between the school and the care home, but apart from
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the chance to hand over a christmas card, it is an opportunity for the children to show off their musical talents. #jingle bells, talents. # jingle bells, jingle talents. #jingle bells, jingle bells, jingle all the way it... we would just sing the carols, and truly speak to them and then go home, but it wasn't like that. we got to speak to all the residents. there is a big age gap at it doesn't matter. i gave her a christmas card, a poem, and a card. what is it like meeting jasmine who has been writing you these letters? it is lovely, isn't it? you are a lovely girl. many of the residency have dementia, but their carers say receiving the children‘s has lifted their spirits. i think it isjust having that connection, letting them share their stories with people and children in particular. what it is
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like living back in the olden days, and the residents get to learn what it is like living hour with the children and all their new technology. it is a great honour to us. technology. it is a great honour to us. and also, we hope they learn a little too. this has gone so well with schools up and down the country, and as far away as australia, starting with similar penpal projects. but there is only one thing left to say for now. merry christmas! lovely, and happy christmas to you. isn‘t that great? lovely, and happy christmas to you. isn't that great? did you have a penpal? no, i never did. my wife spent most of the 19705 and 19805 writing to people all over the world. yes, it was a thing that we used to do. they had an pal clubs. i had a penpal in canada, but also couple in the uk and one in france. didn't couple in the uk and one in france. didn‘t keep in touch. couple in the uk and one in france. didn't keep in touch. you didn't keep up? you can look them up. lot5 of people are getting in touch,
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inspired by this story. including margaret, who says that she started writing to a german penfriend back in 1952. they met in the 19805, when theirfamilie5 were in 1952. they met in the 19805, when their families were teenagers. they will be 80 years old next year. they have a special friendship, kept alive by social media. you were talking about the penpal 5cheme, i am trying to remember what it was, it was the royal mail scheme. gemma tells us that she and her friend leah tells us that she and her friend lea h were tells us that she and her friend leah were writing to 25 years this year to each other. theyjoin through the royal melbourne they‘ll can primer school and now they meet up can primer school and now they meet upa can primer school and now they meet up a couple of times a year. it is the perseverance, like any friendship, you have to work at it. and you can be more honest with penpals because you‘re not going to see them every day. chris writes in to say that he met his penpal at gloucester swimming pool and primer school when he was visiting his grandmother in the summer holidays in 1972. we wrote to one another right through childhood, through our teenage ear5, 5he right through childhood, through our teenage ear5, she moved to canada,
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but four years ago, once again, we reconnected through social media and now my husband and i have a now to canada to stay with her and her family. we are in our late 805 and we have been friends for more than 45 yea r5. we have been friends for more than 45 years. we will also hear about a project which has all the residence in yorkshire exchanging letters with 5tu d e nts in yorkshire exchanging letters with students who are away from home for the first time. that will be interesting. we are taking a look at loneliness. 0ften interesting. we are taking a look at loneliness. often we talk about how older people are, more lonely than when they were younger and their lives were fuller and bu5ier. this can happen to students as well when they go to university, they can feel lonely, a fish out of water, a new environment. they find older penpals are almost become lax arrogant grandparents and they keep in touch and meet up with each other. —— become like sara get grandparents. —— sara get. —— surrogate. become like sara get grandparents. -- sara get. -- surrogate. the last one here from lindsey, 5he -- sara get. -- surrogate. the last one here from lindsey, she was working at the 2012 olympics and she
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metan working at the 2012 olympics and she met an australian who was volunteering there and i5 met an australian who was volunteering there and is now heading off to australia notjust to see the penfriend, but to volunteer at the common game5. see the penfriend, but to volunteer at the common games. see word can lead? the at the common games. see word can lead ? the headlines at the common games. see word can lead? the headlines are coming up. this hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and jon kay. good morning. here‘s a summary of today‘s main stories from bbc news. bee gees singer barry gibb and beatles drummer ringo starr have been knighted, and strictlyjudge darcey bussell has been made a dame in the queen‘s new year honour5 li5t. the former deputy prime minister nick clegg and the author michael morpurgo also receive top honour5, while tv chef rick stein and author jilly cooper become cbe5. absolutely knocked out. knocked — i was thrilled. i couldn‘t believe it. i mean, suddenly to get a letter, you know, and i think "0oh, god, it‘s a bill, a gas bill or something". and it‘s this heavenly thing, saying "you‘re a cbe". it‘s wonderful. wintry weather will continue to dominate the weekend for many parts of the uk with the met office issuing a yellow warning for ice in scotland and northern england,
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and for heavy rain in parts of wales and south west england. yesterday, snow was the cause of many of the problems. several routes were cut off and flights at glasgow airport were temporarily suspended. the rac has warned that driving conditions will continue to prove difficult throughout the weekend. the former labour minister lord adonis has stepped down from his role as the government‘s infrastructure advisor, blaming theresa may‘s handling of brexit. he says he will "relentlessly" oppose the eu withdrawal bill in the house of lords. a government source said lord adonis walked before he was pushed. the white house has said the world is watching how iranian authorities respond to anti—government protests in several cities. in a statement, it said iranians were fed up with the regime‘s corruption and its squandering of the nation‘s wealth to fund terrorism abroad. the us state department condemned the arrests of protesters yesterday. thousands of people are said to have joined demonstrations in cities throughout the country. several families left homeless
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by the grenfell tower fire have not received extra money promised to them by the council to help cover the cost of christmas. the royal borough of kensington and chelsea has apologised saying it made a mistake, after nearly 20 households promised the relief payments missed out. volunteers have released thousands of baby turtles into the sea off west mexico. it‘s part of a project to protect the endangered olive ridley hatchlings, whose numbers have fallen sharply in recent years, largely due to poachers. it‘s hoped the creatures will return to the beach in around 30 years to lay their own eggs. does this morning‘s main stories. this is... was turtles have got to me. total in your throat? emotions. you look after yourself. let‘s talk about the sport, i don‘t no if this
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will make him cry even more. it will! good morning, kat. it isn‘t really good news. at least a fight was put in on the fourth day, they fought a lot anyway, and it looked as though it could perhaps have a win. and after alastair cook managed the 244 not out, it would have thought an innings like that would have been a match winner. at least maybe even series saving, it is the kind of result he would want, having put in that kind of performance, but not to be because steve smith stepped in and said you know what england? not on my watch! not on my turf! but no whitewash which is a yes for england. it will not be 0— —— 5—0 for them. 0ver yes for england. it will not be 0— —— 5—0 for them. over 600 runs in just four tests for him. it is incredible. his legs will need a good rub. are you offering? going to
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say, i‘m not sure... that is why you we re say, i‘m not sure... that is why you were not on... you know what? why not! believes that for her to get in touch with these lives on her own. —— we will leave that. 0prah for steve smith on her own. there will be no whitewash for england in the current ashes series but there‘s still no win yet forjoe root‘s men after steve smith batted out the final day‘s play in the 4th test in melbourne. 0ur correspondent patrick gearey is in melbourne for us and patrick, there‘s not much more that can be said about steve smith that hasn‘t been said already. he has become the immovable object for england, this is his third century of the series, he has been out there batting the more than 30 hours in this ashes series, it is how dominant he has been. he has been such an overriding lee
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unstoppable been such an overriding lee u nstoppa ble force to been such an overriding lee unstoppable force to england and he batted australia through to the draw after england had a glimmer of a child little bit earlier, david warner the openness lobbed a route up warner the openness lobbed a route up in the air and gave away his wicket really to give joe up in the air and gave away his wicket really to givejoe root up in the air and gave away his wicket really to give joe root a wicket really to give joe root a wicket on his birthday. england then got shaun marsh and may have felt they would have been into the australian order but no, smith wasn‘t having any of it and he batted alongside mitchell marsh right through to the evening session, the life went out of the pitch and out of the mcg in truth, and the evening session, no prospect of victory. they shook hands on a somewhat anticlimactic draw. anticlimactic perhaps the england after alastair cook breathed hope into the fourth test for england but i think the overriding feeling patrick would be that there was no whitewash, relief then maybe for england. what do you make of it?|j think we certainly believe. two of the previous three ashes tours to
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this country ended 5—0 there was plenty of talk going the same way so there will be private relief, at least in english dressing room but remember alastair cook to 44 not out, some of england‘s bowling, it was a good performance and they would have felt they had australia on the ropes, and a lot of disappointment to haven‘t picked up a victory. asked joe root after the match not long ago with his primary motion was pride or frustration. very proud of the way we went about it. to come off three very difficult games and put in a performance like thatis games and put in a performance like that is very pleasing and that is what we are about as assigned. that isi what we are about as assigned. that is i think a fair reflection of what we are capable of as a team and on a very responsive wicket to perform how we did in the first and second day with the ball was outstanding. 0ne day with the ball was outstanding. one of the big criticisms of test cricket is that after slogging it out for four cricket is that after slogging it
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out forfour or cricket is that after slogging it out for four or five days, it can still end in a draw and one of the things about this test is it has been a fairly dull last couple of days, very few wickets falling. moving on sydney they would be hoping for some more action, wouldn‘t they? the pitch at melbourne caused problems for england. this wasn't a great advert to test cricket to be honest, after everyday‘s play in the press conference is the subject of the pitch was brought up, it was a slow surface, the scoring was slow as well and these smith who scored all of the runs on it today said it didn‘t offer anything to the bowlers or do anything. i would say that producing a pitch for cricket isn‘t easy and not an exact science and this pitch is also used for australian rules football so it isn‘t easy to balance the two sports but a think you are right, both teams will be looking for a lot more life in the surface in the final test in sydney, that test by the way sta rts test in sydney, that test by the way starts next week. not long to get ready. if you could pass on a message to steve smith from naga,
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she has offered to give him a rubdown after the draw saving performance so if you see him knocking around perhaps have tinny in his hand, all he naga will step in. just his legs! 600 runs, he must be tired. we could become penpals. patrick, pass that on! thank you to patrick, pass that on! thank you to patrick in melbourne. staying with cricket, the england women skipper heather knight has received an 0be in the queen‘s new year‘s honours list. her team—mates tammy beaumont and bowler anya shrubsole are awarded mbes. shrubsole wasn‘t even the first person in herfamily to find out!! i had a letter through the post that mum gave me when i came back. she had actually accidentally opened it, because it didn‘t say the name — she could just see the address, and she opened the post. i think she knew one day before me. what were your feelings when you read that? firstly, i will get an opportunity to meet the queen, i love the queen. so i thought, this would be my best shot. honestly, i was surprised.
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took a couple of minutes to take it in. also in the new years honours list, british and irish lions captain sam warburton has been awarded an 0be. the welshman led the lions in the drawn test series against world champions new zealand during the summer. a full list of honours can be found on the bbc website. there was one premiership rugby match last night — wasps won away at bath, 31—25. the visitors made a great start and were 19—0 up, but this score from gaby lovobalavu proved the difference in the end. wasps edging a bonus—point win to move ahead of saracens into second in the premiership. andy murray made his long awaited comeback from a hip injury yesterday, playing a one—set exhibition match in abu dhabi against spain‘s roberto bautista agut. murray was a last minute replacement for novak djokovic, who‘s delayed his return from an elbow problem. murray was far from his best, though, losing the set 6—2. this was his first competitive match since wimbledon. i felt better as it went on, obviously slow at the start.
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roberto‘s one of the best players in the world. when you haven‘t competed for a long time it takes a while to get up to that pace. i started to feel better towards the end, but i need to keep improving, for sure. good to see him back on court ahead of the australian open. cardiff city slipped to a third consecutive defeat, losing 1—0 at home to preston in the championship. tom clarke got a late winner in a tight contest. millwall beat qpr 1—0 in the other game. phil ‘the power‘ taylor remains on course to win a record 17th world darts title. he‘s reached the semifinals of the pdc world championship after beating world number three seed gary anderson last night. this is taylor‘s final event before retirement, and the chances of him bowing out as world champion have increased considerably with this 5—3 victory at alexandra palace. he‘ll face qualifier jamie lewis in the semifinals.
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reigning champion michael van gerwen plays rob cross in the other semi. it isa it is a time of year when we look back and make a review of what happened in the year, we have seen politics, news, sport, weather. we had science earlier. have our own special way of looking back at the year through the eyes of mike bushell. he has sampled 400 different sporting activities for breakfast, and this year has been particularly busy, from water polo to motocross to toe wrestling to even driving a red sofa. here are some of his best bits from 2017. i don‘t no if i caught a wrestling. from wide red sofa to another. all sorts of things you can practice. do you do this in your garage? i am on
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my feet! i am on my feet! don‘t forget to smile! are you 0k? are you ok? we have liftoff!
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i would like to think all good habits will rub off on you. sorry! don‘t worry. at the moment it seems like an ordinary six a side indoor game. all is that changes with a flick of a switch. iamona i am on a wooden plank. 100 feet in the air. take it easy! i think that
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went badly. yeah. so he started on a sofa but he ended ona bed. so he started on a sofa but he ended on a bed. after all that not surprised he ended up down, he must be exhausted. i favourite with the speedskating, it was a highlight. goad you go for me. you do your go with goats. 0n goad you go for me. you do your go with goats. on top of you? our around you and they can massage you. what i took away was mike is perennially bad most of these sports. it is good for entertainment. but also hundreds of people are just out having a fun time, doing activities. and he goes and does it once and they do at every saturday or sunday. he would
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get better if he stuck to one sport. we get so many messages every week saying that people want to give these ago. that is the best thing about him, he will give everything a go with gusto. any sport involving mike ona go with gusto. any sport involving mike on a horse ends in disaster and i tend to enjoy those. even a hobby horse! what hobbyhorse is not riding today? who knows? 0ddly the wintry one. —— probably. actually, things are turning milder across the country, but increasingly blustery. 13 degrees along the south coast, but in the north it is still subzero. so in scotland and northern england ice continues to be a risk on the roads and pavements. very mystery in some plate —— misty in some places, and we will see in scotla nd some places, and we will see in scotland which turns practice in a letter to the mountains. northern england, the patchy sleet and snow is now clearing away. still foggy over some of the hills but it will
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brighten up. those bright conditions are already with us in wales and southern england as we start the day. a few showers in the south—west. we will see rain with hill snow spread across scotland from south—western north—east, followed on by sunshine and showers. northern ireland, after a wet start to the day, one or two showers here. temperatures up on recent days. a change to the south—west. 0utbreaks of rain by the time we finished the afternoon going into the evening. 0vernight, we are set to see storm deal and strength. —— storm dylan strengthen. northern ireland, southern scotland, northern england and north wales could see an impact on their travel plans tomorrow. let‘s show you what will happen tomorrow. lots of rain across the south which could cause more than flooding. —— minorflooding. blustery winds, rain turning to cell
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across the grampians. later in the night we will see the wind really strengthening. widespread gales and severe gales with gus of maybe 60 or 70 miles an hour. and into tomorrow morning, southern scotland, northern england and north wales could all be at risk of travel disruption thanks to those strong winds. the winds will be strong as in the morning on new year‘s eve, and you will notice quite a bit of snowfall to come across the northern grampians and the highlands. that will turn back into rain across the south. elsewhere, mostly overnight, rain clearing. sunshine and boyle street showers. showers most prevalent ivy and of the day towards the west. temperatures not far off today‘s values, tempered by the strength of the wind. if you were out celebrating tomorrow evening take a waterproof and fairly warm jacket, it will be cold as we strike in the new year. a scattering of showers around, especially across the west, some pushing east on the strength of that reason. 0vernight, rain will
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clear away towards the south—east and as we go into new year‘s day, turning into scotland, we will see a mixture of rain, sleet and snow. for many, other than a couple of showers in the west new year‘s day will be fine. a fresh day, quite a bit breezy cross the country, and some good sunny spells as well. not quite as wintry as we have seen. i know we have been moaning about how weather here, but look at this in upstate new york, where six feet of snow fell in barely just new york, where six feet of snow fell in barelyjust a day. it is not just about the snow in the north—eastern united states. these are the daytime highs for new year‘s eve. toronto is peaking at —16, quebec minus 17. we have nothing to complain about. nothing, absolutely nothing to complain about. so if thatis nothing to complain about. so if that is the high temperature, how low does it go? they are seeing temperatures into the low minus 205 over the prairie in the past few days. you have to add that they are
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seeing strong winds as well. the actual feeling of the temperature is actual feeling of the temperature is a good deal colder. we are seeing niagara falls begin to freeze over in the past 34 hours as well. that would be amazing to see. chilling, literally. we are very grateful, matt. we will never know that you again. you will do as tomorrow. a new years resolution. 0r again. you will do as tomorrow. a new years resolution. or not. millennials — people born in the early ‘805 and who have parents and grandparents in the "baby boomer" generation — are projected to be worse off than their relatives as they struggle to get on the housing ladder and deal with student debt. but there is some good news. the resolution foundation, which analyses living standards, has found the amount of money passed through inheritance each year has doubled over the past two decades and will more than double again over the next 20 years. however, on average, recipients won‘t get the windfall until they are 61. the think tank‘s director, torsten bell, joins us now
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from our london newsroom. good morning. thank you very much for joining good morning. thank you very much forjoining us. just explain what is going on. this is a big change, isn‘t it, in the way that society runs? it is, in the sense that we thought each generation would simply gets better than the ones that came before it. what we are seeing woods today‘s millenials is, not only are they earning less than the people born before them at the same age, they are actually finding it harder to build up assets. things like houses, but also other forms of wealth. there is some good news for them, which is that they will inherit more than any generation since world war two. and for some millenials that will solve some of their problems. they will get that wealth and it will to maintain their living standards. but obviously that will not be shared fully amongst 0rmeau ernie els. some will be lucky, some will not. and it will
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not come early enough for everybody. they will want to have a bigger house when they are having children in their 305 house when they are having children in their305 and house when they are having children in their 305 and 405, but many of them will not help —— not inheritance will their 605, so it will help with inherit —— retirement, but not the kids. not necessarily just a retirement, but not the kids. not necessarilyjust a bigger house, but a house at all. this is not going to bea a house at all. this is not going to be a case of millenials inheriting money they can put down a deposit in a house. it will come later in life. 0bviously a house. it will come later in life. obviously there is a big issue with millenials not owning homes. at 30, they are only half as likely to own as baby boomers were at the same age. that home ownership rate should increase over the next few years. 7596 increase over the next few years. 75% of ra by increase over the next few years. 75% of raby boomers are homeowners today, the millenials are never going to get those levels. it is that high homeownership amongst the baby boomers that means millenials are likely to see this much higher inheritance level. so not necessarily an end a solution to the housing crisis. also, although money will eventually dripped down for some, your research today suggests
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that wealth inequality will remain, or maybe increase, because it is not everybody inheriting, is it? yeah. wealth inequality, the impact of inheritance on that, it is complicated. some people who are poor inherit quite a lot for them, but overwhelmingly, those getting the biggest inheritances are already wealthy. if you own a home you are much more likely to have parents who own a home. you have an 83% chance of having a parent who owns a home. if you do not currently own a home, asa if you do not currently own a home, as a millennial, there is only half as a millennial, there is only half a chance that one of your parents owns their home. so clearly there is a link between children and their pa rents‘ a link between children and their parents‘ wealth and that will be passed down. the big issue for the uk more generally is that wealth is becoming a bigger issue for us. it is growing much faster than incomes. that means people are not going to be able to earn their way into being genuinely rich in our society. they will either need to be born with it or marriot or inherit it later on, thatis or marriot or inherit it later on, that is how you will become very rich. that is a very different kind
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of written to the one we were used in the 20th century. —— britain. of written to the one we were used in the 20th century. —— britainlj am sure there are people watching now in their 405 and their 505, that next generation whose wealth will eventually be passed on, who will say, you know what, i don‘t know if i will have anything left to pass on to my children. my wealth will end up to my children. my wealth will end up paying for care fees and that kind of thing. does your research ta ke kind of thing. does your research take that into account? that is a very serious risk. we should be focusing on that, we should be saying to politicians that it isn‘t 0k to have this level of risk borne by individuals. a lot of their social care costs are likely to come out of their assets. that risk needs sharing out across the population more generally. it isn‘t right to say that all of this wealth will be used up i social care costs. lots of people are lucky and don‘t need social care on that kind of scale, where they need to go into a home or they need intensive care in their home. it is those things which run down people‘s assets. we are reasonably confident we will see higher levels of inheritance for
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millennial sent previous generations, since the war. that doesn‘t mean we shouldn‘t be trying to sort out the social care problem which is a real worry, not only for pa rents which is a real worry, not only for parents going into all the rage now in thinking they will need to deal with it, but also for young people worrying about their parents. —— going into old age. does it seem to you that it has been five jason scrivener is? it is amazing, isn‘t it, how time goes incredibly quickly before christmas and then it slows down. incredibly quickly before christmas and then it slows downlj incredibly quickly before christmas and then it slows down. i find it to be beyond —— opposite. it is slow before christmas, and afterwards it sta rts before christmas, and afterwards it starts running away from you. hopefully most of you have tackled the extra food. we all do it, we buy a bit too much for christmas. but for some people there‘s another festive mountain to climb: what to do with those piles of unwanted presents. in a moment, we‘ll take the advice of a thrifty lifestyle blogger. first, let‘s hear what these shoppers had to say about the kind of gifts that don‘t exactly hit the spot.
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knitwear is always a tricky one, isn‘t it? knitwear is always a tricky one, isn't it? it knitwear is always a tricky one, isn‘t it? it is from the in—laws. you have to wear it. yes, i‘ve had a few nice pieces of knitwear which have only been worn on christmas day. the christmas gift ideas every year which is really annoying is that lynx box set. do you actually still get that? yeah! i have been given the same prison twice and i had to tell them to take it back. two resins, no good. no good. showers lucky, she hasn't had that experience yet. probably the worst present i received was, i got three boxes of 13 that my husband bought me, a fourth bottle of perky, the same. you know, even though you tell
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them, never mind... hollie gregersen is a lifestyle blogger who calls herself the thrifty mum. she‘s been looking into what we can do with those unwanted gifts. did you have any presence that you didn‘t want? that women with four boxes of the same perky, doubled up? not personally, my son received something that is definitely not going to stay in our house. everybody knows that i love wooden toys rather than plastic, but this was a wooden panpac media whistles. he is two years old. as you can imagine, it was quite deafening, it lasted about 30 minutes. you will not be encouraging his musical genius? not in that sense. so the issue is, what do you do it? you don‘t want waste it? issue is, what do you do it? you don't want waste it? unfortunately that one was covered in toddler draw, selected and charity or sell
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it on. —— so i couldn‘t donate it to charity. but there are lots of options for getting rid of things. my options for getting rid of things. my blog, thriftymum.com, is about helping people, especially people with families, who have got tighter budgets than other people and need to make the most of what they have received. so selling it online, on auction sites, on facebook groups, thatis auction sites, on facebook groups, that is a great way of getting some money back on spending up on something that you might need. but there are other things like charities and food banks which will ta ke charities and food banks which will take those off as well. it is a great time to de— clutter and help other people as well. now, swishing, i have not heard of that. what is it? you imagine a swap shop, it is like that but with a bit of wine. you take a long things that you have de— cluttered or received, things we re de— cluttered or received, things were not keen on, which were not to
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your taste. take along that perth in. you exchange it for a token and then everybody has taken all their other things as well, and you get a chance to preview everything and then you have a timed moment when you can run in and grab something. so you have had a bit of an exchange and you give a donation to charity as well. sounds lovely. black friday in your living room. you have to sharpen your elbows, if there is something you really want, because you need to run in and get it. it is just a fun way of decluttering and getting rid of things. what about people who say, why aren‘t you just grateful for what you‘ve got? somebody thought about you and got you something. think about how they wa nt to you something. think about how they want to use it, and use it. you are the one who is paying for storing it. if you have lots of duplicate toys and things like that, you are the one having to buy the bigger house and the garage and the loftus all these things. it is the cost of maintaining it, insuring it. it is the life costs of that. that lady
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will need a new extension for all those bottles of perky. life is tough. i do wonder, people have waiting lists of presence, things that they would like. i would if we should be a bit more specific for christmas and birthdays. tell people what you want? i do. i don't see anything wrong with it. i don‘t want people to spend money on things i wouldn‘t use. so i think it is quite useful. however i think you also have to be careful when you are regifting, with who you do it too. you have to be sensitive to people‘s feelings. you want to avoid sending it back to the same family, and a great way of doing that is using a post—it note. we did actually receive something back that we had gifted earlier year to somebody. take that! i hope it was not be pan pipes. no, it wasn't. it was something noisy. i regiftied something noisy. i regiftied something this year but i forgot to
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put the charger rennet, so i fail that that as well. keep it neat and tidy, use the post—it notes. holly, thank you. let us know your reading experiences as well. —— regifting. hello this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and jon kay. 0ne one of the beatles, abg and a ballerina, lead the way in the queen‘s new year‘s honours. # twist and shout! # twist and shout. it‘s knight fever for barry gibb, the bee gees singer dedicating the honour to his late brothers maurice and robin. and strictlyjudge darcey bussell is made a dame for services to dance, saying she‘s truly humbled.
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good morning, it‘s saturday 30th december. also this morning... the government‘s infrastructure adviser, lord adonis, quits as he delivers a scathing verdict on theresa may‘s plan for brexit. we‘ll speak to him just after 8:00am. yesterday it was the snow causing chaos. today further warnings are in place across parts of the uk. good morning. ice is the main issue for parts of northern england and scotland this morning. but if anything, it turns milder today ahead of some very windy weather from storm dylan coming tonight. all the details of that in the next 15 minutes. in sport, australia captain steve smith — who else — holds england at bay. he scores yet another century, and england can only draw the fourth ashes test, with hopes of a win dashed.
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good morning. first, our main story. the former beatles drummer, ringo starr, barry gibb of the bee gees and the former deputy prime minister, nick clegg, have all been knighted in the new year honours list. stars from the world of sport who are recognised include the wales and lions rugby union captain, sam warburton and the world cup winning england cricket captain heather knight, who both receive an 0be. 0ur entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba has more details. # twist and shout! # twist and shout. more than 50 years after beatlemania, the fab four‘s drummer has been honoured with a knighthood... # what would you do if i sang... ..recognising ringo starr‘s half—a—century—long contribution to music. # i get by with a little help from my friends. # tragedy! former bee gee barry gibb said he was humbled and very proud to be made sir barry.
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# with no—one to love you, you're going nowhere. war horse author and long—time children‘s laureate war horse author and one—time children‘s laureate michael morpurgo, who too has been made a knight, he hopes his award highlights the importance of literature for young people. reading is a great bastion against stupidity and bigotry and ignorance. it is the greatest weapon we have, really. and the greatest assistance we can give them is to make them readers. strictlyjudge darcey bussell, who has occasionally performed on the programme too, is to be made a dame. i'm dicky roper. i'm the night manager. those being made cbes, the next highest level of award, include actor hugh laurie for services to drama,
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and best—selling riders authorjilly cooper. absolutely knocked out. knocked — i was thrilled. i couldn‘t believe it. i mean, suddenly to get a letter, you know, and one thinks "0oh, god, it‘s a bill, a gas bill or something". and it‘s this heavenly thing, saying "you‘re a cbe". it‘s wonderful. # i've got to run away. singer and campaigner marcd almond is made an 0be for services singer and campaigner marc almond is made an 0be for services to arts and culture. musician and producer wiley, known as the ‘godfather of grime‘, is made an mbe. commentator: pass to warburton. brilliant catch by the captain! in the world of sport, sam warburton, who has captained wales and the british and irish lions, is made an 0be. most of those being honoured are ordinary people doing extraordinary work, like efe ezekiel, who acts as a mentorfor young people.
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of course, young people are everything to me. i‘m passionate about them and passionate their life, their well—being and their welfare, so for me to be recognised for my passion is one of the greatest honours ever, so i‘m in complete gratitude and appreciation. the majority of honours do go to people who are not in the public eye but who have given exceptional service. and in 2018, the honours committee say they will be looking to particularly recognise individuals who were involved in the response to, and the aftermath of, the london and manchester terror attacks the london and manchester terror attacks, and the fire at grenfell tower. we‘ll be speaking to the youngest recipient of the british empire medal at twenty past eight and to the author michael morpurgo, who has been knighted, just after 9:00am. wintry weather will continue to dominate the weekend for many parts of the uk, with the met office issuing a yellow warning for ice in northern regions. the worst of the snow fell yesterday across northern england and scotland where roads were closed. flights at glasgow airport were also temporarily suspended. the rac has warned that driving conditions will continue
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to prove difficult. matt is in the weather centre to tell us what we can expect. snow has been the festive nightmare for those on the move over this period. these were the snowy scenes yesterday. thankfully today‘s snow is not the major concern. if you are out across parts of northern england and scotland, widespread ice and some hill fog for those travelling. later on we will see some rain turned to sleet and snow again over the hills of scotland. today, snow is not the main concern. into tonight, attention turns to strengthening winds with the arrival of storm dylan on the shores. named by the irish met service with the republic of ireland bearing the brunt of it. into northern ireland, southern scotland and northern england tomorrow. we could see damaging gusts of 60 or 70 mph, and they could cause travel problems
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tomorrow. we will have a full update in the next ten minutes. the former labour minister lord adonis has stepped down from his role as the government‘s infrastructure advisor, blaming theresa may‘s handling of brexit. he says he will "relentlessly" oppose the eu withdrawal bill in the house of lords. let‘s get more detail from our political correspondent emma va rdy who is in our london newsroom. political correspondent emma va rdy it's political correspondent emma vardy interesting tir because it‘s interesting timing, this, because he has known for a long time that brexit would happen, and he has been pretty clear on how theresa may wa nted been pretty clear on how theresa may wanted to do it. he has been a very high—profile critic of brexit, long arguing the referendum, that there should be another referendum and brexit should be reversed. perhaps this is no surprise. in his resignation letter, it really is much of that same, a real tirade against the government‘s handling of brexit. he says theresa may has become an ally of ukip and the tory ha rd become an ally of ukip and the tory hard right. there are those who say his differences and clashes with the
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government have become so great he simply couldn‘t continue in this position. lord adonis says he‘s resigned. number ten said position. lord adonis says he‘s resigned. numberten said hejumped before he was pushed. don‘t forget that his resignation is also a protest over a big rail bust up. he is very annoyed the government decided to end the east coast franchise of the main line with virgin and stagecoach three years early. he said it is a bailout that will cost the taxpayer millions. it's will cost the taxpayer millions. it‘s also part of his decision as well. some army labour and lib dem benches have praised his principled sta nce benches have praised his principled stance against brexit. and some on the labour. some in the government have said his resignation is long overdue. last month we saw the resignation of the head of the social mobility commission. there are those who say it looks like theresa may is struggling to create cross— party theresa may is struggling to create cross—party cooperation in the centre ground over this. but it is
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pretty clear with lord adonis, from both sides, that his continued clashes with the government have become so great that he would be unable to continue, so there is a sense of inevitability about this. ma, thank you, we‘ll put that to him inafew ma, thank you, we‘ll put that to him in a few minutes. and we‘ll be speaking to lord adonis in a few minutes — that‘s at 8:10am. the white house has said the world is watching how iranian authorities respond to anti—government protests in several cities. in a statement, it said iranians were fed up with the regime‘s corruption and its squandering of the nation‘s wealth to fund terrorism abroad. the us state department condemned the arrests of protesters yesterday. thousands of people are said to have joined demonstrations in cities throughout the country. several families left homeless by the grenfell tower fire have not received extra money promised to them by the council to help cover the cost of christmas. the royal borough of kensington and chelsea has apologised saying it made a mistake, after nearly 20 households promised the relief payments missed out. younger people will enjoy the biggest "inheritance boom"
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of any post—war generation — that‘s according to the think tank, the resolution foundation which analyses living standards. those born in the 805 and early 905, so—called millenials, will have to wait for the windfall though. the study estimates that the average age they will inherit something will be 61 years old. if the cold weather has got you thinking about summer sunshine, there‘s a warning today from the consumer group which?, that holiday firms may be misleading consumers. many tour operators promote money—off deals, providing travellers book by a certain date. but a study found that half the holidays advertised were the same price — or even cheaper — after the offer expired. the firms involved have all denied misleading their customers. commercial broadcasters, including
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channel 4 and itv, are to receive an extra £60 million from the government to increase the range of children‘s television programmes in the uk. the money, left overfrom last bbc licence fee settlement, will pay more than half the costs of original shows. will pay more than half the costs of originalshows. ministers will pay more than half the costs of original shows. ministers say they wa nt to original shows. ministers say they want to see greater variety in a market currently dominated by the bbc. lord adonis has quit as theresa may‘s infrastructure tsar and delivered a scathing verdict on the prime minister‘s handling of brexit. he joins us now from our london newsroom. thank you forjoining us. i am intrigued by the timing of your decision to go. you took on this role a couple of years ago. the brexit referendum was 18 months ago. why leave now? there were two reasons why i had to leave now. the first is that the eu withdrawal bill, the legislation that takes us
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out of the european union, the first stage of taking a sad, comes to the house of lords next month. as your reporter said earlier, i have been a vocal critic, but will take those criticisms up to a wholly new level when the bill arrives in the house of lords to become one of the leading opponents of it. it‘s impossible to combine fighting the eu withdrawal bill in the house of lords whilst being a government adviser. the second reason, last month the government had announced the bailout of stagecoach and virgin, the franchise operators on the east coast mainline. i have been silence from criticising that decision. taking those two things together, i had no choice but to stand down. the government you have left say you have dubbed before you are pushed. i have no idea whether they were proposing to dismiss me, but it speaks volumes about how they value independent advice if they
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we re value independent advice if they were indeed proposing to dismiss me. the point of a national infrastructure commission is that it should be an independent body giving advice to the government without fear or favour. 0ne advice to the government without fear or favour. one of the really depressing things about the government at the mound, which u nfortu nately government at the mound, which unfortunately is a reflection of the brexit malaise sweeping whitehall, is that the government has become hypersensitive to any criticism, to anyone who criticises them on brexit or anything else, even if they are supposedly independent advisers. they will get attacked. michael heseltine, who was on the commission, got sacked from the commission, got sacked from the commission, even though it is an independent commission, he got sacked because he opposes brexit. and now i hear rumours they were considering dismissing me as well. i think unfortunately it‘s a very sad reflection of the state of politics in this brexit storm we are now engaged in. you are a labour appear, but were appointed to this role by a conservative government. —— you are
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a labour peer. they have known you we re a labour peer. they have known you were a remainer, and anti—brexit. but your role was independent. why couldn‘t you continue to do that independent role for the government, but also standing up and house of lords opposing the withdrawal bill. the truth is, i might have done, if they hadn‘t opposed me. i was weighing it up in my mind before christmas as to whether i could oppose the brexit bill in the house of lords and also give advice. the critical issue was when the government try to silence my criticisms of the bailout with the east coast rail franchise. it goes to the heart of the independence of the national infrastructure commission. if i am not free to give them my frank advice. and i am a former transport secretary who had to deal with failing transport infrastructure when i held the office chris grayling now holds. at the point they tried to silence me
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as an independent adviser, i felt my utility had ended. it also puts big questions over the the existence of all independent advisers if they are subject to being oppressed or dismissed at the whim of a minister. the government insists it hasn‘t been a bailout on the railways. the language you use, you compare brexit with the appeasement of the nazis. ina with the appeasement of the nazis. in a resignation letter you say brexit is a populist and nationalists spasm worthy of donald trump. if you‘re watching bbc brea kfast trump. if you‘re watching bbc breakfast this morning, one of those 17 or 18 million people who voted brexit, they might be angry to hear somebody in your position use that language and isn‘t it patronising or do rocketry to the majority? the country needs leadership at the moment. as long as people hear what is essentially a fraudulent agenda for brexit. remember the bus with £350 million per week on it, which has now been completely torn to shreds as the government has agreed
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a deal with the eu that runs into tens of billions of pounds that we will have to pay, one by one, the lies and populist nonsense underpinning brexit is being exposed. i don‘t blame the british people. i think the people made a fairjudgment on the facts made available to them when they were asked to vote. what i think should now happen, as one by one the lies are exposed, the british people should have a fresh vote on the terms of brexit, on what is actually proposed to happen when we leave the eu in march of 2019 when people can see the impact on britain‘s trade and theirjobs see the impact on britain‘s trade and their jobs and see the impact on britain‘s trade and theirjobs and livelihoods. i believe that with the right leadership, what we need at the moment is leadership, and not followership. we have too many politicians chasing after nigel farage and the reverse takeover ukip has done of the conservative party, and i‘m afraid part of the labour party as well, we need to move beyond that, we need real leadership for the country, and then i think the country will take a mature and
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wise decision, to stay in the eu, safeguard trade and jobs. and also, this is crucially important, to tackle a deep social crisis that is tackling so much of britain. a crisis of low educational standards, very poor quality of life, serious mental health problems, seriously underfunded nhs. we don't have long, but if you want to do all those things, isn‘t the right thing for you to do, stick around and help make it happen at a time when the country faces great change and uncertainty, to be part of the solution, instead of saying, i will not work with theresa may. you have said the past thatjeremy corbyn should go. apparently you will not work with anyone. i assure you i will be sticking around. i will be in the house of lords every day after the new year, debating the social crisis affecting britain and the eu withdrawal bill. i‘m not going anywhere. the public have a right to expect that in this time of national crisis, people like me do stick around, and we also speak to
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them frankly. i don‘t think people will any longer put up with politicians who just read opinion polls, listen to nigel farage, and then simply repeat what he has been saying. we have had too much of that in the last couple of years. it‘s time for people like me to speak completely, frankly, and honestly with the british people about the challenges we face and i will be doing that in the new year. thank you for speaking to as frankly on brea kfast. you for speaking to as frankly on breakfast. we will be getting reaction from the conservative party to that resignation later in the programme. wintry weather will continue to dominate the weekend for many parts of the uk, with the met office issuing a yellow warning for ice in northern regions. not as slowly as it has been. that‘s one crumb of comfort for those travelling today. and not as snowy.
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temperatures in double figures across the south but still cold air in place. the biggest risk of ice on the roads and pavements. a weather front pushing into south—west scotland. pushing into the southern highlands and eventually into the grampians. it‘s grey and misty but things are brightening up and the ice risk will gradually diminished. no eyes further south. temperatures of double figures across most areas. some showers to the south—west and more around the channel islands. they will push through during the morning. there will be more rain gathering in the south—west later. much of england and wales with a dry afternoon. some showers in the north. scattered showers in northern ireland and southern scotland in the afternoon. some could be heavy with hailand afternoon. some could be heavy with hail and thunder. the weather for that still produces a covering of
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snow over mountains will be towards caithness, sutherland and the moray firth. the most it will be a milder day than yesterday. into tonight, the area of low pressure developing, storm dylan, just forming at the moment. it has been named by the irish weather service. the republic of ireland will bear the brunt of the weather system, but northern ireland, southern scotland and northern england, into new year‘s eve, there will be strong and potentially damaging wind. moving into tonight, notjust the window strengthening uk wide, we will see outbreaks of rain spreading northwards which could cause minor flooding. as it hits colder air with icy conditions in northern scotland, we will see ice and snow across the grampian mountains. for those travelling tomorrow, northern ireland, southern scotland, northern england and north wales, we could see severe gales developing. essential gusts of 60 and 70 mph, at
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their strongest in the morning. strong winds elsewhere. 0vernight rain quickly clearing away from the south—east. a day of sunshine and a few showers. some of them thundery in the west later. 0utbreaks few showers. some of them thundery in the west later. outbreaks of rain and melting snow will clear and we should see at least a little bit of afternoon sunshine. temperatures of five or 6 degrees. still double figures in the south. that leads to a cool evening. if you‘re out to celebrate the end of 2017 and the start of 2018, temperatures at midnight, between three and 8 degrees. showers possible anywhere. take something waterproof with you. quite breezy and it will stay blustery into new year‘s day itself. showers in the morning in the south. some hail could be mixed in but they will gradually depart. for many of you, if you want a walk to clear your head, it will not be a bad day for it. it will be blustery and cool for it. it will be blustery and cool, but a great deal of dry and sunny weather, particularly across england and wales. we‘ve been talking this morning
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about the new years honours list — but not everyone on it is a household name. alongside the musicians, prima ballerinas and television presenters are people who have dedicated themselves to serving their communities. one of those is lucia mee, who at 18 years old, is the youngest person to be recognised with a british empire medal for her work raising awareness about organ donation. she joins us now from our belfast newsroom. thank you for talking to us today. congratulations, how do you feel about it, the youngest ever on the list this year? thank you, com pletely list this year? thank you, completely shocked to be honest. tell us why you have been recognised in this way. as we said in the introduction, lots of us know the musicians and the ballerinas, those in the public eye, you not so much, but your work has been so important.
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i have had three liver transplants myself. since then, i have been raising awareness about organ donation and trying to promote it to the general public. especially in schools. 0ne the general public. especially in schools. one of the main goals i haveis schools. one of the main goals i have is to have organ donation onto the school curriculum, and teach young people about it, get young people having those conversations with theirfamilies. people having those conversations with their families. tell us about your condition. you have autoimmune hepatitis. what happens in your body and how long has it been happening? i was first diagnosed when i was eight. it means my own immune system has attacked my liver cells, which means i went into liver failure when i was eight. that‘s when i had my first transplant, november of 2007. following that, i needed a second in
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january of 2009, and most recently had a third transplant in september of 2015. well all of this has been going on, you have competed in the british and world transplant games. you have carried the olympic torch. that must have been an amazing highlight. it was incredible. the british and world transplant games, the yearly transplant games are the highlight of my year every year. i love competing in them. all the friends i have made there. and the whole team atmosphere, and everybody being together as transplant recipients, knowing we have all had life—saving organ transplants that really do mean the world to us. life—saving organ transplants that really do mean the world to usm will mean the world to you and your families as well. people are going to be watching you and thinking, i think she has done enough! liver transplants since the age of eight, battling with that and trying to
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achieve in the sporting arena as well. but you have also found time to put this campaign together to raise awareness. how did it come about and what drove you to do it?|j have always been involved in raising awareness of organ donation from my first transplant. however, when i was on the waiting list for my third transplant, i kind of didn‘t have much else to do, to be honest. i‘m not somebody who is not good at not doing anything. i gave myself a little project, and it turned into the campaign that we have now, which is live loudly, donator proudly. it's is live loudly, donator proudly. it‘s about having the conversation with your loved ones, making sure you know their wishes about organ donation. at the end of the day, they are the ones who make the decision about whether to donate your organs or not, if that situation arises. and that you are so much more likely to say yes to donation if you know what your loved
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one would have wanted. it‘s not like you are making the decision yourself. you are just carrying out someone else‘s wishes, and that‘s what the campaign is all about. and trying to get it onto the education system so people can learn about it from a young age and realised it doesn‘t have to be a scary conversation. it‘s something that needs to be normalised and talked about a lot more. you are an inspiration and we are delighted for you. we are very pleased you took the time to talk to us. you have a levels coming up in the summer. good luck with those. hopefully we will talk to you again. enjoy this moment. thank you very much. brilliant stuff. you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news. time now for a look at the newspapers. former newspaper editor phil hall is here to tell us what‘s caught his eye. is interesting piece in the
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telegraph, the front page. confusion over the law and when you can and can‘t use a mobile phone in the car. an astonishing story. a lot of people travelling at this time of year. these days, the apps on your phones are up—to—date, technology moves quickly and they download so quickly. people use phones more instead of gps and sat—navs. in april, finds increased on using a telephone in your car, using a phone in yourcar. telephone in your car, using a phone in your car. the law says that the events is using a mobile phone. some police forces have been arresting people for using a mobile phone as a gps or santalab. people adapt the phone, touch it, move the table bit. that is illegal. but people think using a phone for a phone call or
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text m essa g e using a phone for a phone call or text message is illegal. lawyers often benefit from confusion, but for them to say that this is confusing, we don‘t understand where the law is, and for the crown prosecution service to admit there has been some debate about what use means. it‘s all about using a mobile phone instead of holding one. it's about being sensible, isn‘t it? we have had people on this sofa who have had people on this sofa who have lost family members because people were distracted by their phone. if it‘s going to distract you, don‘t do it. phone. if it‘s going to distract you, don't do it. that's right. if it is ina you, don't do it. that's right. if it is in a cradle and q1 touching it, it's it is in a cradle and q1 touching it, it‘s thing. i think gps systems themselves are distracting. is changing the channel on your radio in the car, is that similar? it‘s using a device. you only tend to do that once. that is the argument. it is that time of year when you look back. after the general
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election, i think many people would have written theresa may off. then she had the party conference, a bit ofa she had the party conference, a bit of a disaster, the coughing during the disastrous speech. but the daily mail point out she has stuck with it through a difficult situation. jeremy corbyn has stayed on the fence, keeping out of the debate, because he knows brexit is toxic. theresa may was a remainer, but she has taken the mandate of the people and tried to do a deal in the best way she possibly can. people criticising from the outside help realise how complex it is. when jeremy corbyn has said, for instance, i could go and discuss this better, debate and negotiate better, where is the evidence for that? he has not come up with solutions. the daily mail saint theresa may has stuck to her guns and come through. the polling is starting to turn. the headwind is with india 2018. plenty more tough negotiations to come. the sun
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newspaper having a bit of a go at prince william. there is a suggestion prince harry is more popular than prince william. i think people relate to harry in a more warm weight than they do to william. at the facts speak for themselves. the sun newspaper points out that the queen had 296 engagements last year as opposed to william‘s 190 odd. he did have a full—timejob up untiljuly, though. but the sun says that many of his are junkets, going to football matches, rugby matches, and a few premieres. 2018 will be a big yearfor him. and a few premieres. 2018 will be a big year for him. as a former tabloid man, are they trying to stoke up some division between the brothers? a popularity contest?|j think brothers? a popularity contest?” think newspapers sense the public
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view. in prince harry you have somebody who is seen as a bit of a war hero. his wife to be is seen as somebody who is a career woman. that didn‘t happen with kate, who sat and waited for eight years for a prince charming. she was working, wasn't she? what was she doing? was it fashion? i don‘t think she had the career of depth and substance that meghan has. newspapers are some in this up. so you assume. unless you are good friends with meghan markle. do you remember your wedding day?” do. this plus one is no longer the norm. people now say actually, the plus one, unless i know them, it‘s because i think for weddings people are trying to outdo each other. they have to have an ice bar, a tribute band. it used to be very normal and very ordinary, didn‘t it? the love
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at the centre tv was the real thing. now —— centre of it was the real thing. people can‘t afford a plus one. i always say to anyone getting married, i say remember it‘s not about the wedding day, it‘s about the marriage. you're so wise. oh, shut up! be quiet. phil, a pleasure to talk to you. we‘ll speak in an hour. with or without a plus one, phil has got himself an invitation to windsor cast until may for harry and meghan. headlines coming up. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and jon kay. coming up before 9am: matt will bring you the weather in 15 minutes, but first a summary of this
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morning‘s main news. bee gees singer, barry gibb, and the beatles drummer, ringo starr, have been knighted, and strictlyjudge, darcey bussell, has been made a dame, in the queen‘s new year honours list. the former deputy prime minister, nick clegg, and the author, michael morpurgo, also receive top honours, while tv chef, rick stein, and author, jilly cooper, become cbe5. wintry weather will continue to dominate the weekend for many parts of the uk, with the met office issuing a yellow warning for ice in scotland and northern england, and for heavy rain in parts of wales and south west england. yesterday, snow was the cause of many of the problems. several routes were cut off and flights at glasgow airport were temporarily suspended. the rac has warned that driving conditions will continue to prove difficult throughout the weekend. the former labour minister, lord adonis, has stepped down from his role as the government‘s infrastructure advisor, blaming theresa may‘s handling of brexit. he says he will "relentlessly" oppose the eu withdrawal bill in the house of lords.
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a government source said lord adonis walked before he was pushed. several families, left homeless by the grenfell tower fire, have not received extra money promised to them by the council to help cover the cost of christmas. the royal borough of kensington and chelsea has apologised saying it made a mistake, after nearly 20 households promised the relief payments missed out. volunteers have released thousands of baby turtles into the sea off west mexico. it‘s part of a project to protect the endangered 0live ridley hatchlings, whose numbers have fallen sharply in recent years — largely due to poachers. it‘s hoped the creatures will return to the beach in around 30 years to lay their own eggs. very good memory isn‘t it. very good memory isn't it. how do they do it? no idea. i'll ask the
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next turtle i see. it‘s 8. 35. we‘re talking ashes, at least in the a whitewash. morning. no, the whitewash. morning. no, the whitewash has been avoided. i think england thought they might get a win. the rain came yesterday which is where the cause of the problem was. there was not enough cricket yesterday for them to get stuck into the australian order. then steve smith steps up. england avoided the whitewash afr the fourth ashes test ended in a draw. australia batted out the final day in melbourne. it was their captain, steve smith again they have to thank for saving the match. england started the day with purpose, taking two quick wickets — joe root — bowling on his birthday — and dismissing david warnerfor 86. but then smith dug in and could not be budged — frustrating england with a steady century — and batting out the day to deny them the victory. england will be relieved to avoid the whitewash but know they‘ve missed a great chance to claim one back in the series.
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reporter: are you getting tired of batting at any point? no, i'm enjoying it. shame we had to call it off in the last hour there. i could have had another hour out there. it was good fun. no, look, i‘m enjoying it at the moment. i feel like was good fun. no, look, i‘m enjoying it at the moment. ifeel like i‘m hitting the ball really well. yeah, hopefully i can end the series really well in sydney as well. it's the way he went about it, you know, to come off three very difficult games and put in a performance like that is very pleasing. that's what we're about as a side. that's a fair reflection of what we're capable of as a team. on a very unresponsive wicket to perform how we did on the first and second day with the ball was outstanding. that‘s the boxing day test done and
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dusted. the football continues. the christmas break is over for dan walker. football focus team are back with us. what have you got coming 7 with us. what have you got coming ur with us. what have you got coming up? our final show of the year. looking forward to. it plenty to packin looking forward to. it plenty to pack in today. we have alvaro morata. he‘s chelsea‘s record signing on the programme. we have an interesting interview with sam alla rdyce. interesting interview with sam allardyce. he‘s gone back to everton. he‘s unbeaten in seven games. he takes on bournemouth this weekend. we speak tojohn motson as well. here‘s a bit of that interview with big sam. when i spoke to you in the summer, you were undecided about whether you wanted to come back into clu b whether you wanted to come back into club football. are you kind of glad that you did? only because it's everton. turned a number ofjobs down before that and this one was really realistically too good to turn down, too good not to come out of retirement to try and bring as
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much success to everton as i possibly can. there you go, a bit of sam there. he‘s cheery isn‘t he (! ) there you go, a bit of sam there. he's cheery isn't he (! ) also andre villas—boas. he went to china and he‘s taking a break from football. he‘s going to drive the dhaka rally, which starts next weekend. it‘s in his blood. he loves motor sport. his uncle did it twice. he‘s taking a break entirely. he‘s coming back next year some time. he‘s going to race the rally. something else of great interest, we talk a lot about mental health on bbc breakfast, one infour mental health on bbc breakfast, one in four people struggle with mental health issues. footballers aren‘t divided from that either. 400 either current or former footballers have gone to the pfa with a mental health issue just this year. chris kirkland and his wife are on the programme today talking about a situation that he personally went through, and in real detail as well. he was on a
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pre—season tour a few years ago, on the top of a hotel, thinking about throwing himself off. his wife talked him down and got him home as quickly as possible. i know they earn a lot of money and how can you be affected by this. but it‘s a big issue in all sports and right across society as well. also, virgil van dijk, £75 million for liverpool, record drans dijk, £75 million for liverpool, record dra ns foreand dijk, £75 million for liverpool, record drans foreand we have —— transfer, we have mark lawrenson, who signed for £900,000 in the summer of 1981. we‘re on at midday with martin keown as well (tennis now. andy murray made his long awaited comeback from a hip injury yesterday, playing a one—set exhibition match in abu dhabi against spain‘s roberto bautista agut. murray was a last—minute replacement for novak djokovic, who‘s delayed his return from an elbow problem. murray was far from his best though, losing the set 6—2. this was his first competitive match since wimbledon.
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i felt better as it went on. 0bviously i felt better as it went on. obviously a little bit slow at the start. i mean roberto is one of the best players in the world. when you haven‘t competed for a long time, it ta kes haven‘t competed for a long time, it takes time to get back up to that pace. i started to feel a bit better towards the end. but yeah, i‘ll need towards the end. but yeah, i‘ll need to keep improving for sure. phil "the power" taylor remains on course to win a record 17th world darts title. he‘s reached the semi—finals of the pdc world championship, after beating world number three seed, gary anderson, last night. this is taylor‘s final event before retirement, and the chances of his bowing out as world champion have increased considerably with this 5—3 victory at alexandra palace. he‘ll face qualifier jamie lewis in the semi—finals. reigning champion michael van gerwen plays rob cross in the other semi. we‘ve been talking about the new years honours list. plenty of sportsmen as well, sam warburton,
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heather knight, the women‘s cricket captain. so loads of people on the bbc sport website, if you want to see exactly who‘s got the gonings this year. —— gongs. see exactly who‘s got the gonings this year. -- gongs. very organised, the website. they always are. they‘re the prime source of organisation in bbc sport i think. in the bbc generally! just check the website. they‘ll have got it right. thank you very much. when it came to arts and culture in 2017, you had to go to hull and back. as the uk‘s capital of culture, the port city, staged an artistic event every single day this year. 0ur arts and entertainment correspondent colin paterson has been there to look back atjust a few of the highlights. hull started its year as city of culture with a bang, a musicalfire work display onjanuary culture with a bang, a musicalfire work display on january 1. culture with a bang, a musicalfire work display onjanuary 1. the crowd told me just how thrilled they were. you put some money into that, it
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makes london look like noddy. the opening event, made in hull, turned buildings into giant screens, showing the history of the city. come on, come to hull! they were off. at least one cultural event took place every day and now, at the end of the year, people don‘t want it to be over. i've lived in hull for 73 years. has there ever been a year like this? no, never. people who are coming from out of town are saying to us, "you know it's not like we thought it's going to be. it's actually brilliant." and the blade was the most exciting. they fitted it from here to there. yes more than a million people saw the blade, a giant wind turbine turned into a 75—metre sculpture, so popular a permanent home has been found for it. i wish to communicate with you transformed the thornton housing estate into a work of art. and katy perry visited for radio 1‘s big weekend. there‘s always
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something entertaining about a huge american star saying hello to somewhere unlikely. let's go hull! she didn‘t disappoint. hull‘s aim was to attract more than a million visitors, but three million came. was to attract more than a million visitors, but three million camem feels a more confident city. can you see it in the redevelopment. the amount of people who have come to art for the first time are having opinions about art, getting vofrd in it. -- opinions about art, getting vofrd in it. —— involved in it. it makes the case for culture again, that culture is the lifeblood of our cities. the turner prize was held in hull and bbc breakfast enlisted the local primary school as art critics. that looks like a potato. and with like a police helmet on it. it's not as cold as this time yesterday...m was a year which put hull on the map, literally. the bbc director—general ordered every time the weather map appeared hull was to be on it and that will continue. but there are those who think chances have been missed and worry about the future of grass—roots arts in the city. one event above pubs, small
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community theatre groups and they feel they‘ve been slightly overlooked. if you think of the massive amount of money spent on gigantic events, perfectly justified, they‘ve been brilliant, but if some of that could have been set aside and trickled down. where does hull go from here to try and build on the momentum, the company who ran 2017 will continue to put on events. i think we still want to be very ambitious, be ground breaking and do things which attract national and do things which attract national and international media. we‘ll do fewer things, but i don‘t think they‘ll be any less significant. hull had always been the city at the end of the line. in 2017, it became a destination of choice. martin green who we saw in that report, in charge of the whole thing basically, he‘s been girve a cbe in the new years honours. he says he wa nts to the new years honours. he says he wants to share it with the city. that‘s great stuff. matt has the weather for us this
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morning. we were worried about snow yesterday, weren‘t we. today ice is the problem. then that‘s going to change again. very good morning. it is. ice the big issue for many this morning. in fa ct, big issue for many this morning. in fact, today‘s going to be a good deal milder than it has been through the past few days for most, but increasingly blustery and through tonight into tomorrow, the strong winds will certainly become of note. where it‘s iciest at the moment, parts of scotland and northern england, temperatures have been well below freezing overnight, still are. even by mid—morning, some still will be. a weather front is pushing even by mid—morning, some still will be. a weatherfront is pushing in, bringing rain to many. it turns to snow over higher ground. brightening up snow over higher ground. brightening up in northern ireland. still cloud in northern england, a mixture of rain and drizzle here. very misty over the hills with extensive fog. the rest of england and wales bright start, blustery, particularly towards the south—west. a few showers dotted around, channel islands bearing the brunt of those. much of england and wales will see sunny spells to take us through mid—morning into the afternoon, even
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northern england brightening up nicely. a few showers here. same too northern ireland and southern scotland. they could be heavy with thunder. in mainland scotland it remains on the cold side. for most note the temperatures as we finish the day in double figures across much of england and wales and into tonight, it will stay mild here. but stronger and stronger winds will bring rain across much of england and wales, northern ireland and eventually into southern scotland, turning to snow as it hits the grampians and the southern highlands. you notice away from the far north, temperatures holding up into new year‘s eve. the big story through tonight and into tomorrow — the strength of the wind. here comes storm dylan. a storm named by the irish weather service. it will bring widespread gales, maybe severe gales to northern ireland, southern scotland, northern england and north wales through the night and into tomorrow morning. so if you are on the move tomorrow, particularly early on, be prepared, there could be travel disruption, certainly on ferry services an the britains here. strongest of the winds will be
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during the morning. across the uk, blustery winds. the wet weather we see across east anglia and the south—east clears away. 0utbreaks see across east anglia and the south—east clears away. outbreaks of rain through the morning and early afternoon in northern scotland. much of scotla nd afternoon in northern scotland. much of scotland really with snow over higher ground and then sunshine for eastern areas, a few showers in the west, as we go into tomorrow afternoon. temperatures just a degree or so down on today‘s values. but still mild enough across the south. that takes us into the big evening events. if you are heading out, take something water proof with you. showers spreading from west to east on quite a blustery wind. but not desperately chilly out there, as we ring in 2018, most places will be clear of frost at this stage. maybe a few flurries of snow over the higher ground of scotland. but it‘s rain elsewhere, with clearer skies in between. and as for new year‘s day, well, a good day to clear the heads. we will see the risk of rain, though, just scraping along southern counties as we go into new year‘s day. then brighter conditions developing with sunshine and a few showers, mainly in the north and west, where they could be wintry.
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but sunny spells too and new year‘s day will feel that bit cooler once again. of course, we have seen some wintry weather here. it‘s now time to say could be worse, because over to say could be worse, because over to the other side of the atlantic, ta ke to the other side of the atlantic, take a look at this house. had to be dug out for residents in lorraine in u pstate n ew dug out for residents in lorraine in upstate new york. we saw six feet of snow here, where real severe winter weather is taking a grip across the northern us and canada at the moment. how is this for a temperature, not just been moment. how is this for a temperature, notjust been snowing, it‘s been bitterly cold. temperatures the other morning in international falls minnesota, minus 38. just put that into perspective. the domestic freezer is usually set around minus 20. no! i wonder how many people live there? it's quite a few. it‘s known as the ice box of the us because it gets very cold. but it was a local record for them. i think it beat one set back in 1924. i bet their roads and trains
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and theirairports... 1924. i bet their roads and trains and their airports... all working perfectly! yes, but in the defence, we spoke about this yesterday, in defence we don‘t get it as often as they do. they have to prepare for it. you're a font of knowledge as usual matt. thanks very much. 8. 49. as we head into the new year, many of us will be thinking about renewing insurance policies, switching energy suppliers or perhaps even booking a summer holiday. turning to price comparison websites often seems like a great way to bag a bargain, but is it? lesley curwen, from radio 4‘s money box has been speaking to the competition regulator about their concerns. lesley joins us now from our london newsroom. what have you discovered? well, first of all, i should say that the regulator did a year—long study and found that overall these were a force for good. comparison websites
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make things quick and easy for us, overall a force for good. you have to remember that they‘re completely free to us, which is great, but the regulator says please think, these are big businesses. now they earn maybe in the hundreds of millions of pounds a year. if you think about just one of them, compare the market.com was recently valued as 2. £2.2 billion. you just have to be wary. they‘re not doing it forfree. it's wary. they‘re not doing it forfree. it‘s a boon for all of us. but the point is that the regulator has concerns about transparency, has concerns about transparency, has concerns about transparency, has concerns about how easy the sites are to use and how they use our data. the thing to remember is — yes, it‘s all about price, but actually sometimes you shouldn‘t be looking at price as the only thing that matters. for example, when you‘re getting insurance. the way that these websites express the excess that you might have to pay varies enormously. so you need to really dig down to look at that, otherwise you might get a cheap policy with a high excess, that‘s
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not going to be good for you.“ some of these websites are making such enormous profits like the kind of money you were talking about, how are they making their money, if it‘s free for us to use, where does their money come from and should that make us money come from and should that make us suspicious? suspicious, not necessarily no. there are different business models. some of the websites take advertising. some of them don‘t. the basic model is commission. i‘ve changed my buildings insurance through a comparison website. i got a cheaper price. i paid about £150 for it, and of that, a fixed amount would have gone as commission, a slice of it goes to the comparison website. now we can‘t see how much that is. we talk to one website go compare.com that said it was £30 to £40 each time for each switch. it could be more. the question is: is that good for the whole competition system? yes, it is, from one point of view, you could have a small insurer who
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can still get their products onto the comparison website even with a tiny advertising budget. the other thing that it does raise is this concern that in some cases, the price comparison websites may be too close to the companies whose products they offer. ok, thank you very much indeed. lesley is looking more into that on money box today on advice on how you can find out what‘s going on with your money. that‘s radio 4, mid—day today. in november you may remember that we told you about a group of school children from kidderminster who had become pen pals with elderly residents living at a nearby care home. they‘ve been keeping in touch. after five months now of correspondence the children have been able to put faces to the names they‘d seen just written down in letters. signed, sealed, and this time it‘s being handed over in person. we are going to see our penpals and i am really excited. it is an unlikely friendship,
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but with just one mile and 80 years between them, jasmine and her school friends are finally making the trip up to barchester care home to meet their penpals for the very first time. that is very nice, isn‘t it? that is lovely. have you got something to give, james? we have been writing to the residents here sincejuly now, and the children have been loving receiving replies as well as writing about events which have happened in their lives. more than 400 letters have been sent between the school and the care home, but apart from the chance to hand over a christmas card, it is an opportunity for the children to show off their musical talents. #jingle bells, jingle bells, jingle all the way... i thought we would just sing
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the carols, not really speak to them and then go home, but it wasn't like that. we got to speak to all the residents. there is a big age gap but it doesn't matter. i gave her a christmas card, a poem, and a card. what is it like meeting jasmine who has been writing you these letters? it is lovely, isn‘t it? you are a lovely girl. many of the residents here have dementia, but their carers say receiving the children‘s has lifted their spirits. i think it‘s just having that connection, letting them share their stories with people and children in particular. what it was like living back in the olden days, and the residents get to learn what it is like living now with the children and all their new technology.
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i love seeing the children with us. it is a great honour to us. and also, we hope they learn a little too. this has gone so well with schools up and down the country, and as far away as australia, starting with similar penpal projects. but there‘s only one thing left to say for now. merry christmas! big smiles on their faces. big smiles on theirfaces. a big smiles on their faces. a lovely scheme. georgina binnie, the founder of the writing back project, a scheme where older yorkshire residents exchange letters with students, joins us now along with rebecca hewitt, who is a pen pal volunteer. you‘ve been writing to who? you've been writing to who? my pen pal is called barry. he‘s just a resident who lives just outside of leeds. we‘ve been writing forjust sibs before summer. how's that going? what‘s the relationship like? it's going? what‘s the relationship like? it‘s nice. we have meet ups every six months or so. that‘s when we have like a tea party. there we go,
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you are both together. yeah. you can learn a lot from the older generation. i certainly have, like barry‘s really active. generation. i certainly have, like barry's really active. what have you done to barry‘s head wear there? that‘s his christmas hat. i actually don‘t know if he won the competition. but that was his entry. if he didn‘t, he was robbed! competition. but that was his entry. if he didn't, he was robbed! indeed. well done, barry. the point of this is loneliness, combatting loneliness toa is loneliness, combatting loneliness to a certain extent. regardless of the age, it‘s circumstance that often dictates that. absolutely. so when i set up the project i was volume untiering at a care home. i thought at first, right i'll be tackling loneliness in older people. but actually found with the students that got involved in the project that got involved in the project that often they might be home sick or lonely, particularly in that first term away from home at university. so, combatting almost like not having family right next door, but another person, i don‘t know, rebecca, you tell me, barry could almost have been like a
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surrogate uncle or grandparent. yeah, we communicator week or so. how much i speak to my own grandparents. we speak about everything, just life, families, problems. can you tell barry things that maybe you wouldn‘t tell anybody else? i guess so. or does barry tell you that he wouldn‘t tell anyone else? barry has a keen interest in art. that‘s helped me get back into my art, which i‘ve not done since gcse. that's my art, which i‘ve not done since gcse. that‘s something we‘ve, yeah, bonded over. what about it's a digital society we live in. to actually get a student, how old are you? 20. a 20-year-old who has grown up you? 20. a 20-year-old who has grown up with the internet pretty much, all your life, texting second nature — sitting down and writing a letter -it — sitting down and writing a letter — it seems like a chore. how do you switch people‘s mind sets to that? i've had students arrive at the university and join the scheme and say they've never written a
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hand—written letter before. but actually i think they really like the nostalgic function of the letter. so taking the time out of their schedule, out of their busy exam, their schedule, out of their busy exam , essay their schedule, out of their busy exam, essay work and they like sitting down and having the time to reflect on their thoughts and write something in person. lots of people caught onto this this morning and are getting in touch with us. for lots of you, having pen pals has changed your lives really and continues to. david got in touch, "i started writing to a girl when i was in the army 40 years ago. we‘ve now been married 36 years." we can show you a picture of this one. this person says they married their pen pal — she married her pen pal after meeting after seven years. they were teenagers when they started writing. he answered an ad in a rock magazine and they still have their letters in the loft. you are seeing lucy and paul, who were married injune 2006,
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married 11 years now with two children. it's children. it‘s interesting, naga was asking about digital society and e—mails, a lot of people getting in touch saying what might have started decades ago as a hand—written letter, pen pal relationship has developed into e—mails every day or snapchat, instagram, the way we keep in touch is change soing much. absolutely —— changing so much. absolutely. some of our pen pals will in future years keep in contact themselves via e—mail or they'll meet up separately from our events and go for coughies and meet face—to—face as well. but we feel with the letter writing project that during the course of the year actually having something physical to open and to get through the door as well, you get so many bills, junk mail, having something really thoughtful come through the post means a huge amount. myths can be disspelled as well. you might have
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thought oh, barry lonely old man, he might want to visit. he has a busy life as well. he's more active than me. definitely he is. he's in performances all the time. yeah, i mean, you know as well, he's everywhere. there you go. you had time to talk to us today. barry clearly didn‘t! thank you both very much indeed. morning to barry as well. headlines coming up: hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and jon kay. a beatle, a bee gee, and a ballerina lead the way in the queen‘s new years honours. # twist and shout! ringo starr becomes sir ringo.
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it‘s knight fever for barry gibb, the bee gees singer dedicating the honour to his late brothers maurice and robin. and strictlyjudge darcey bussell is made a dame for services to dance, saying she‘s truly humbled. good morning, it‘s saturday 30th december. also this morning... the government‘s infrastructure adviser, lord adonis, quits as he delivers a scathing verdict on theresa may‘s plan for brexit. he tells us he has a duty to highlight what he calls mistakes being made by ministers over brexit. yesterday it was the snow causing chaos. today further warnings are in place across parts of the uk. good morning. ice is the main issue for parts of northern england and scotland this morning. but if anything, it turns milder today ahead of some very windy weather from storm
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dylan coming tonight. all the details of that in the next 15 minutes. in sport, australia captain steve smith — who else — holds england at bay. he scores yet another century, and england can only draw the fourth ashes test, with hopes of a win dashed. good morning. first, our main story. the former beatles drummer ringo starr, barry gibb of the bee gees and the former deputy prime minister, nick clegg, have all been knighted in the new year honours list. stars from the world of sport who are recognised include the wales and lions rugby union captain, sam warburton, and the world cup winning england cricket captain heather knight, who both receive an 0be. 0ur entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba has more details. # twist and shout! # twist and shout. more than 50 years after beatlemania, the fab four‘s drummer has been honoured with a knighthood... # what would you do if i sang... ..recognising ringo starr‘s half—a—century—long contribution to music.
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# i get by with a little help from my friends. # tragedy! former bee gee barry gibb said he was humbled and very proud to be made sir barry. # with no—one to love you, you're going nowhere. war horse author and one—time children‘s laureate michael morpurgo, who too has been made a knight, he hopes his award highlights the importance of literature for young people. reading is a great bastion against stupidity and bigotry and ignorance. it is the greatest weapon we have, really. and the greatest assistance we can give them is to make them readers. strictlyjudge darcey bussell, who has occasionally performed on the programme too, is to be made a dame. i'm dicky roper.
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i'm the night manager. those being made cbes, the next highest level of award, include actor hugh laurie for services to drama, and best—selling riders authorjilly cooper. absolutely knocked out. knocked out — i was thrilled. i couldn‘t believe it. i mean, suddenly to get a letter, you know, and one thinks "0oh, god, it‘s a bill, a gas bill or something". and it‘s this heavenly thing, saying "you‘re a cbe". it‘s wonderful. # i've got to run away. singer and campaigner marc almond is made an 0be for services to arts and culture. musician and producer wiley, known as the ‘godfather of grime‘, is made an mbe. commentator: pass to warburton. brilliant catch by the captain! in the world of sport, sam warburton, who has captained wales and the british lions, is made an 0be. most of those being honoured are ordinary people doing extraordinary work,
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like efe ezekiel, who acts as a mentorfor young people. of course, young people are everything to me. i‘m passionate about them and passionate their life, their well—being and their welfare, so for me to be recognised for my passion is one of the greatest honours ever, so i‘m in complete gratitude and appreciation. the majority of honours do go to people who are not in the public eye but who have given exceptional service. and in 2018, the honours committee say they will be looking to particularly recognise individuals who were involved in the response to, and the aftermath of, the london and manchester terror attacks, and the fire at grenfell tower. lizo mzimba, bbc news, buckingham palace. we have been talking to lots of people today who have been honoured and we will be speaking to sir michael morpurgo, the man behind
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warhorse in next minutes. the former labour minister, lord adonis, has stepped down from his role as the government‘s infrastructure advisor, blaming theresa may‘s handling of brexit. he says he will "relentlessly" oppose the eu withdrawal bill in the house of lords. a government source said lord adonis walked before he would push. in a few minutes we will get the reaction from the conservatives to that resignation. wintry weather will continue to dominate the weekend for many parts of the uk, with the met office issuing a yellow warning for ice in northern regions. the worst of the snow fell yesterday across northern england and scotland where roads were closed. flights at glasgow airport were also temporarily suspended. the rac has warned that driving conditions will continue to prove difficult. matt is in the weather centre to tell us what we can expect. the good news is the wintry weather, like this from wakefield yesterday, will take a bit of a back—seat in the next 24 hours. if you are on the roads and pavements shortly then there is still ice around,
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particularly in northern england and scotland. rain is pushing northwards across scotland, that will quickly turn to snow over modest hills in central and northern areas later. that‘s only part of the story with the wintry weather taking a seat. a deep area of low pressure developing over the atlantic. this is storm dyla n, over the atlantic. this is storm dylan, named by the irish weather service. it will have a big impact in the republic of ireland. but even here, over northern ireland, southern scotland and northern england, they could see damaging wind and gales over the new year. the white house has said the world is watching how iranian authorities respond to anti—government protests in several cities. in a statement, it said iranians were fed up with the regime‘s corruption and its squandering of the nation‘s wealth to fund terrorism abroad. the us state department condemned the arrests of protesters yesterday. thousands of people are said to have joined demonstrations in cities throughout the country. several families left homeless by the grenfell tower fire have not
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received extra money promised to them by the council to help cover the cost of christmas. the royal borough of kensington and chelsea has apologised saying it made a mistake, after nearly 20 households promised the relief payments missed out. people who are now in their 205 and 305 will enjoy the biggest "inheritance boom" of any post—war generation, according to a report today. the resolution foundation says people born in the early 805, and who have parents and grandparents in the "baby boomer" generation, will be left record sums, but they will have to wait, on average, until the age of 61. more from business correspondent joel line. young people aged between 17 and 35 hoping to get on the housing ladder could be set to inherit a lot of money from their parents. but it may come too late for some. according to the resolution foundation, the value of inheritances is set to double over the next 20 years, thanks to baby boomers aged between 50 and 70 leaving
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behind expensive property. but the think tank says the average age someone inherits is now 61, meaning too late for many of today‘s house hunters. across the piece, the financial situation, the living standards picture for millenials is quite concerning. they‘re earning less than those 15 — or 10 or 15 years before them were at the same age, they are much less likely to own a home, and while they might be saving into a pension, it is much less likely to be one of those gold—plated final salary pensions, so in the round, quite a concerning picture for far too many millenials today. so, 17—35—year—olds inheriting more money than any previous generation will only be able to use it in their old age, or by passing it onto their own grandchildren. joel line, bbc news. joe lynam, bbc news. if the cold weather has got you thinking about summer sunshine, there‘s a warning today from the consumer group which?, that holiday firms may be misleading consumers.
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many tour operators promote money—off deals, providing travellers book by a certain date. but a study found that half the holidays advertised were the same price — or even cheaper — after the offer expired. the firms involved have all denied misleading their customers. volu nteers volunteers have released thousands of baby turtles into the sea off west mexico. it‘s part of products to protect the olive ridley hatchlings, whose numbers have decreased in recent years because of poaching. it is hoped they will be in the sea around 30 years before coming back to lay their own eggs and the whole process begins again. sta rs of stage stars of stage and screen have been lining up on social media to acknowledge and celebrate those who have been celebrated in the new
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year‘s honours list. tim rice says ringo starr‘s honour is well overdue. and barry gibb is said to bea overdue. and barry gibb is said to be a songwriter guests. comedian and author david walliams has also congratulated ringo starr and barry gibb saying there music is the soundtrack to so many lives. matthew bourneis soundtrack to so many lives. matthew bourne is already a sir and he says he‘s delighted for dame darcey bussell. he describes her as a great friend, an ambassador, and one of the greatest dancers the has ever produced. and grime artist wiley was rather more six in it, big up to the queen! and he has also changed his twitter handle to wiley mbe. war horse author michael morpurgo has been knighted for services to literature and charity. we can speak to sir michael now. thank you forjoining us. you have
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already had a cbe. now the knighthood. how does it feel?” already had a cbe. now the knighthood. how does it feel? i have been rather spoiled this morning to been rather spoiled this morning to be honest. it‘s wonderful to hear from so many friends and family. it's from so many friends and family. it‘s almost like christmas all over again. it‘s lovely. and it‘s an opportunity to thank the people... nelson mandela always said that if you get anywhere in life, you get there because of the people help you on the way. in my case, my wife is the first person who has helped me all the way through, the writing, and setting up my charity, which has been going for 40 years. we have 100,000 children come down to the three farms from cities all over the country. so she should be getting a big gong as well as lady in front of her name. it‘s an opportunity as well to talk about children‘s
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literature and how important it is to young people growing up today. they learned so much, notjust spelling and punctuation, which is important, but what you learn from a book is understanding. you learn empathy, understanding other people, people of different colours and religions and ages. reading can do that. it‘s wonderful to be in a position to maybe do that more powerfully. you mentioned your wife, claire, and the support she has given you. you also mentioned your charity. the farms for city children charity. the farms for city children charity isn‘t something people might not know much about. how did it come about? when claire was 11, she had some holidays in devon, stained in a pub. —— staying in a pub. she didn‘t like claire heiney around in the day
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at 11, so she told her to go out for at 11, so she told her to go out for a walk. claire, as a city girl, learned to love the countryside by going on walks around devon. it became the biggest thing in her life. children are small, they are closer to the caterpillars and shrews and worms, and they love that. we both thought, this is what all children have a right to. so we devised a scheme where we would set up devised a scheme where we would set upa devised a scheme where we would set up a charity and invite kids from cities all over the country. they come with primary school classes of 30 or40, and come with primary school classes of 30 or 40, and they don‘tjust come with a clipboard to the farms, they help around the farm. they dig up potatoes, they pick up the eggs, they do everything that a child can
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do safely on a farm, and learn about whether food comes from and about nature. very often they will not see a lot of that living in a city. it gives them a positive view of that. it's gives them a positive view of that. it‘s also useful, they can see how they can work and their work is valued. they work with real farmers, alongside them. it gives them a sense of self esteem, and self—worth, which is so important.” can‘t let it go without talking to you about war horse a book he wrote in 1982 that has gone on to the theatre and film and is now something people recognise and have an affinity with. a charming story that you are very well known for. it's that you are very well known for. it‘s one of those lucky things. the book came out in 1982 and wasn‘t at all successful. they rang me up many years later and
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said they wanted to make a play of the book. they wanted to do it with puppets. i wondered the book. they wanted to do it with puppets. iwondered how the book. they wanted to do it with puppets. i wondered how they could doa puppets. i wondered how they could do a serious play about loss and grief in the first world war with puppets. they told me to come and look and they were magical. the moment i saw the work of the puppets, and spoke to the directors at the national theatre, i knew i was in the most wonderful hands. and then two years later the play came out. and it was a huge, huge hit. it is touring around at the moment. i love to go and see it and even take pa rt love to go and see it and even take part sometimes. i have been presented with the rightjacket and trousers and shoes so i can join presented with the rightjacket and trousers and shoes so i canjoin in the chorus and cast and nobody knows
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iam the chorus and cast and nobody knows i am there. it‘s fantastic. the chorus and cast and nobody knows i am there. it's fantastic. you have given it away now. everybody will be looking out for you. i am properly made up. when i was 17 i came up to your studios. they sprang a surprise me. and when i was 70 stop i was sitting on your couch on my birthday. they brought upjoey the puppet behind me. it was my 70th birthday present. we were happy to give you such a treat. it was a pleasure to speak to you this morning. enjoy the knighthood. thoroughly deserved. thank you for talking to us. yellow time for the weather with matt taylor. i wonder if we can make it sir matt taylor. it's it‘s not too bad, the start to 2018.
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even today the wintry weather is starting to take a back seat. increasingly windy, particularly so tonight. a big contrast as far as temperatures are concerned. cold air in northern england and scotland and northern ireland. icy conditions to start the day. we are starting to see rain spread its way in, which will turn to snow over the hills, especially the trossachs, southern grampians and highlands over the morning. it‘s particularly grey at the moment, misty and drizzly. a few showers around in the late morning but more sunshine break in. plenty of sunshine elsewhere. temperatures widely in double figures and some into the teens. there is more clout in the english channel bringing rain at times to the channel islands. eventually wetter into the south—west. sunshine this afternoon across northern england, southern
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scotla nd across northern england, southern scotland and northern ireland. some showers around, some could be heavy with hail and thunder. a band of sleet and hill snow across central scotla nd sleet and hill snow across central scotland in the middle of the morning. in the afternoon it will be to the far north. temperatures much more miles than recent days. tonight, wet weather will spread north and east across all areas. given the ground is quite wet and saturated in the south already, we could see some risk of minor flooding, but things will dry out later. cold air later in northern scotland. we will see snow over higher ground as the weather system works its way in. the weather system all linking into storm dylan. it has been named by the irish weather service. it will have a big impact on the republic of ireland. even parts of northern ireland, southern scotland, northern england and north wales, we could see widespread gales, and they could be severe, into tonight and into new year‘s eve. check on the radio before you
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head out, there could be travel disruption. the strongest wind in the morning. even elsewhere, strong and gusty winds to start the day. rain in the south—east. sunshine coming out for many into the afternoon. widespread gales. temperatures down on today‘s valleys. still not bad for this time of year. if you are out celebrating tomorrow evening takes something waterproof just in case tomorrow evening takes something waterproofjust in case with showers spreading from west to east across the uk. temperatures above freezing for the vast majority, as they will just about be for the start of new year‘s day itself. we could see some rain pushed away from the south—east corner. a wet start to new year‘s day. a bit of uncertainty about that. sunshine and showers into the mix in the north and west. some showers wintry across scotland and it will start to feel fresh and again. no gold embossed envelope
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from the palace for that, matt! lord adonis has quit as theresa may‘s infrastructure tsar and delivered a scathing verdict on the prime minister‘s handling of brexit. earlier, he told this programme he would fight the eu withdrawl bill. the eu withdrawal bill, the legislation that takes us out, the first stage of taking us out of the european union, comes to the house of lords next month. as your reporter said earlier, i have been a vocal critic, but i will take my criticism to a whole new level when the bill arrives in the lords and i become one of the leading opponents of it. i don‘t think it‘s possible to combine fighting the eu withdrawal bill in the house of lords will be a government adviser. the second reason was, as you also reported, last month the government announced the bailout of stagecoach and virgin, the private sector operators of the east coast rail
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franchise. i believe that was a huge mistake was not the government has tried to silence me since then from criticising it, even though i‘m an independent adviser. i thought that position had become unsustainable. taking those two things together, i thought i had no choice but to stand down. the government that you have left say you have stood down before you are pushed. i have no idea whether they were proposing to dismiss me, but it would speak volumes about how they value independent advice if they were indeed proposing to dismiss me, because the whole point of the national infrastructure commission is that it should be an independent body giving advice to the government without fear or favour. 0ne body giving advice to the government without fear or favour. one of the really depressing things about the government at the month, which is u nfortu nately a reflection government at the month, which is unfortunately a reflection of the brexit malaise which is sweeping whitehall, is the government has become hypersensitive to any criticism, to anyone who criticises them on brexit or anything else. lord adonis explain why he has resigned. we are joined lord adonis explain why he has resigned. we arejoined now by conservative mp chris philp, who is
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in our london newsroom. after all the other resignations in the last few weeks, it‘s another big loss for theresa may. i wouldn't describe it asa theresa may. i wouldn't describe it as a big loss. sources tell me he jumped before he was pushed. and lord adonis has made a variety of quite inflammatory comments for some time. on the 26th of november he called for brexit to be overturned. he describe people who favoured brexit as extremists. in mid—december he even had the bad people pursuing a brexit policy to appeasers in 19305 and 405. he has form in saying these sorts of things. i think it‘s right he resigns and sources tell me he would have been pushed anyway, given the very inflammatory things he has saying. but theresa may has made it clear she wants, in this pre—brexit moment, to bring people in from all sides, from both sides in the brexit debate, to have a government of all the talents. he was part of that and
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to lose him, it looks sexy can‘t hold that pre—brexit coalition together. i don't accept that. the government are listening to views and bringing people inside the tent, as it were, from a whole range of different backgrounds. but the comments andrew adonis has made in the last few months and has made today are extremely inflammatory, andi today are extremely inflammatory, and i think extremely illjudged. what he is essentially saying is that he holds the british public who voted for brexit by a majority of 1.4 million, in contempt. coming from a man who has never held high elected office than being a lib dem district councillor, i think that‘s quite some cheek. i think he needs to temper his remarks and use much less infla m matory to temper his remarks and use much less inflammatory language. the government are implementing the decision of the british people. they are doing it in a balanced and sensible way. we had a great decision a few weeks ago that we will move forward to discuss future trade arrangements. talks will start
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ina good trade arrangements. talks will start in a good free trade deal with the european union that will preserve jobs in this country and in europe as we leave the european union. it‘s as we leave the european union. it‘s a balanced and sensible thing to do. let‘s talk about his job and resignation. he was part of the labour government beforehand, and he was brought in by your party, albeit asa was brought in by your party, albeit as a labour peer to serve in this role. clearly he had a use. the words in his resignation are scathing about the prime minister‘s handling of brexit. no credible plan, hurtling towards the emergency exit door without any credibility. he says there is a populist surge thatis he says there is a populist surge that is being undermined by the government, and ministers are not able to deliver on things they should be like nhs and housing, because they are preoccupied with the eu. that is harmfulfor a prime minister trying to assert her authority. it would be if it were true, but it‘s nonsense. state education, referred to in his
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letter, all the data shows clearly that education standards in this country are significantly higher than when labour left office in 2010. looking at the number of children in good and outstanding schools. and his remarks on brexit, they are clearly ludicrous when two or three weeks ago we got the green light, dealing with the so—called divorce bill, dealing with the northern irish border and dealing with the free movement of people to guarantee the rights of eu citizens and uk citizens. we will talk about free trade injust and uk citizens. we will talk about free trade in just a few days‘ time. the fact is quite clearly contradict the ludicrously extreme comments and com pletely the ludicrously extreme comments and completely unguided comments that lord adonis has been making. so you now call him an extremist for criticising other people.” now call him an extremist for criticising other people. i didn't call him an extremist. it comesjust a couple of weeks after alan milburn also left a similar government advisory role saying theresa may‘s
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government was ignoring important uk issues because they could only deal with brexit stubble i don‘t accept that. i mentioned the school‘s example. —— with brexit.” that. i mentioned the school‘s example. -- with brexit. i don't accept that. we have hs2 powering ahead. we have all these things happening, as we also negotiate exit from the european union. ifigure on the fact, he just has them wrong. chris philp, thank you forjoining us. the resignation last night of lord adonis. it‘s time to take a look at the papers. the former newspaper editor phil hall is here to tell us what‘s caught his eye. you are a parent. you have picked out this story about half of parents not checking who their child talks to online. a survey by children's charity barnardo ‘s. to online. a survey by children's charity barnardo ‘5. despite 80% of
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pa rents charity barnardo ‘5. despite 80% of parents admitting there is potential risk to children in cyberspace, they say the majority of devices at christmas were sold to u105. i am barely cyber savvy, but i would not know where the risks are. we occasionally read court cases and newspapers and hear about these issues, but our parents being properly educated? i heard about a school, for instance, who are having pa rents school, for instance, who are having parents in in the evening to tell them about cyber risks and how to stop them and protect children. how do you draw the line between being savvy and snooping? that's a problem. i was talking about this with my 18—year—old daughter and she said with children under 12 then maybe, but over 12, you have to trust them. they have to be old enough, clever enough and sticky enough, clever enough and sticky enough to hide stuff if they want to. you have to have a bond of trust and relationship as well. it is a difficult line. especially with all
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the devices being given as presents over christmas. how often do you go to court as a reporter, and you see witnesses coming out. this piece in the times you have picked, it‘s interesting, try to put witnesses at their ease. chelsea county court, they have seven dogs on rotation who go into the court, particularly in family cases, including care proceedings, where children might have to give difficult evidence. adoption cases, people facing debt, and witnesses, who can be nervous. they say the dogs distract them. they say the dogs distract them. they give the example of an elderly person giving evidence in a case, and how stroking and playing with a dog beforehand calmed them down. it has often been said dogs and being a pet owner can be very beneficial to people. here it is helping in a real—life court case. people. here it is helping in a real-life court case. we have pieces about dogs going to care homes and into schools and other stressful situations. has anybody ever set you
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up situations. has anybody ever set you up on situations. has anybody ever set you upona situations. has anybody ever set you up on a date? i have never done a blind date. some people might appreciate this. the days of online and swiping. it's all about tinder and swiping. it's all about tinder and online now. in new zealand, they should be applauded for going back to single dates and singles events. you hear a lot about tinder and other apps, people not taking it seriously. will we go full circle and go to single night at clubs like idid and go to single night at clubs like i did when i was young. this was a love train that goes to a particular town with only about 186 people once per year. all the singles from around new zealand gather at this event once a year and it‘s a great attraction. very fun. an egg hunt in the daily mail. it‘s
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for £30 million faberge eggs in the uk. this egg is only one of two. the whereabouts is unknown. this lady discovered online by searching around, trying to find about eggs. she‘s interested in that subject. she‘s interested in that subject. she discovered that this egg was sold in this country for only £1250, equivalent of £36,000 today. but it was sold 50 years ago and hasn‘t been seen since. it‘s in this country. she found searching ebay. she found some russian press cuttings indicating where it was. she‘s sleuthed it through. somewhere ona she‘s sleuthed it through. somewhere on a mantelpiece, probably in britain, is this egg worth £30 million. there it is. if that's on your mantelpiece or on the kitchen table... find me on twitter. we're in touch in the usual ways. get in touch. it looks like a snitch. yes,
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from harry potter! maybe that's what it was based on. a fabulous story to finish on. we were talking about christmas presents, regifting, whether you‘re grateful or not. this little girl has had probably one of the best presents she could wish for. what a fabulous mum she's got. charlie cousins. this little girl was born with an incomplete arm. she had a blood clot before she was born. she‘s been trying to work with prosthetics limbs and it hasn‘t worked. her mother saw a tv programme talking about 3d machines and how they can make all sorts of devices. she and a friend searched out a company in sheffield called 3d folks, who took on the job of trying to make charlie a new arm that would suit her particularly. so they did it with 3d machine, made a plastic arm. this guy designed the arm he wanted, made the model for it and they created this arm. she‘s been able to open her christmas presents
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for the first time in her life. look at her, what a fantastic picture of i°y- at her, what a fantastic picture of joy. i love that she chose the colours for that arm as well. you can tell that, it‘s fun. colours for that arm as well. you can tell that, it's fun. the purple and yellow. she chose that. her first words were, "look i‘ve got ten fingers and one of the things she can do now is count on herfingers. the small joys that can do now is count on herfingers. the smalljoys that really warm the heart. you look at that big smile. we could get science and medical world together what could be done. fantastic. lovely talking to you this morning. thanks for coming in. hgppy this morning. thanks for coming in. happy new year. and to you. headlines in a moment. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and jon kay.
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coming up before 10am, matt will bring you all the weather and kat has the sport. first a summary of this morning‘s main news. bee gees singer, barry gibb, and the beatles drummer, ringo starr, have been knighted, and strictlyjudge, darcey bussell, has been made a dame, in the queen‘s new year honours list. the former deputy prime minister, nick clegg, and the author, michael morpurgo, also receive top honours, while tv chef, rick stein, and author, jilly cooper, become cbe5. wintry weather will continue to dominate the weekend for many parts of the uk, with the met office issuing a yellow warning for ice in scotland and northern england, and for heavy rain in parts of wales and south west england. yesterday, snow was the cause of many of the problems. several routes were cut off and flights at glasgow airport were temporarily suspended. the rac has warned that driving conditions will continue to prove difficult throughout the weekend.
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the former labour minister, lord adonis, has stepped down from his role as the government‘s infrastructure advisor, blaming theresa may‘s handling of brexit. he says he will "relentlessly" oppose the eu withdrawal bill in the house of lords. a government source said lord adonis walked before he was pushed. detectives are appealing for witnesses after a man opened fire on a fast food restaurant in east london seriously injuring two teenagers. police were called to plaistow last night, witnesses at the scene described shots having been fired. two 16 year olds were injured, one suffered a gunshot injury to the back, the second boy suffered a gunshot wound to the leg. their injuries are not life threatening. the white house has said the world is watching how iranian authorities respond to anti—government protests in several cities. in a statement, it said iranians were fed up with the regime‘s corruption and its squandering of the nation‘s wealth to fund terrorism abroad. the us state department condemned the arrests of protesters yesterday. thousands of people are said to have joined demonstrations in cities throughout the country.
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volunteers have released thousands of baby turtles into the sea off west mexico. it‘s part of a project to protect the endangered 0live ridley hatchlings, whose numbers have fallen sharply in recent years — largely due to poachers. it‘s hoped the creatures will return to the beach in around 30 years to lay their own eggs. they‘re back already.. time flies, hey. this morning are the main stories. let‘s find out what‘s happening with the ashes. wasn‘t a whitewash. it wasn‘t. you can see what happened after this morning‘s action, well, overnight action during the ashes. there is steve smith shaking the hand ofjoe root, the england captain. it was a draw. you could be forgiven for being mif fed if you we re forgiven for being mif fed if you were alastair cook. you get your act
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together, get that 244 not out, a hero‘s innings. together, get that 244 not out, a hero's innings. here we go. yeah and then up steps the australian captain who says no, mate. that‘s as far as i‘m going with my australian accent. very good. england have managed to avoid a whitewash after the 4th ashes test ended in a draw. australia managed to bat out the final day in melbourne and it was their captain steve smith, once again, they had to thank for saving the match england started the day with purpose, taking two quick wickets. joe root — bowling on his birthday — dismissing david warnerfor 86. but then smith dug in and could not be budged — frustrating england with a steady century — and batting out the day to deny them the victory. england will be relieved to avoid the whitewash but know they‘re currently up against one of the game‘s greatest batsmen. reporter: are you getting tired of batting at any point? no, i‘m enjoying it. shame we had to call it off in the last hour there. i could have had
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another hour out there. it was good fun. no, look, i‘m enjoying it at the moment. ifeel like i‘m hitting the ball really well. yeah, hopefully i can end the series really well in sydney as well. very proud of the way we went about it. you know to come off three very difficult games and put in a performance like that is very pleasing. that's what we're about as a side. that's a fair reflection of what we're capable of as a team. on a very unresponsive wicket to perform how we did on the first and second day with the ball was outstanding. staying with cricket, the england women‘s skipper, heather knight, has received an 0be in the queen‘s new year‘s honours list. her teammates, tammy beaumont and bowler anya shrubsole, are awarded mbes. shrubsole wasn‘t even the first person in herfamily to find out!!
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i had ihada i had a letter through the post that mum gave me when i came back. she had actually accidentally opened it, because it didn‘t say the name, you could just see the address. she was opening the post and opened it. i think she knew a day before me. what we re think she knew a day before me. what were your feelings when you read that? firstly, i might get an opportunity to meet the queen. i love the queen. so that was my first thought. i was like, oh, love the queen. so that was my first thought. iwas like, oh, this love the queen. so that was my first thought. i was like, oh, this could be my best shot. no, obviously i was surprised. it took a couple of minutes to take it all in. also in the new years honours list, british and irish lions captain, sam warburton, has been awarded an 0be. the welshman led the lions in the drawn test series against world champions new zealand during the summer. a full list of honours can be found on the bbc website. new year‘s eve tomorrow. the last day of the year. it is, that took me by surprise actually. no it's not! yes, it is naga. have you got your
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diary and all that sorted out? one man who always has a busy diary every week of the year, mike bushell, 400 sports he‘s tried. we‘re talking about the new years honours list we think mike should be awarded something for services to minority and odd sports. and for giving it a go. shall we see what he‘s got up to. from one red sofa to another. there‘s all sorts of things you can practise. you do this in the garage? i‘m on my feet. music
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don‘t forget to smile. 0h, 0k. whoa! we have liftoff. i‘d like to think our good habits will rub off on you. sorry. don't worry. at the moment it seems like an
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ordinary six aside indoor game. all that changes, though, with a flick ofa that changes, though, with a flick of a switch. i‘m ona i‘m on a wooden plank, 100 feet in the air. laughter i think that went badly wrong. off off he goes into the sun set. off he goes into the sun set. well deserved rest. the fearless mike
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bushell. fearless and peerless, absolutely right. we really enjoyed those. goat yoga was up there. i liked the speed skating. i want to know how many injuries he‘s had — 4oo know how many injuries he‘s had — 400 sports in a year, lots of them, well, performed quite spectacularly badly. well he's very wary of horses. yes, he is. he has come off. he has come off a horse a few times. showjumping with ben, wasn‘t he, and he fell off the horse then. and then was mauled by two boxer dogs when he landed. mauled in a friendly way, a savage licking by two boxers when he landed. he survived all that. i saw him a couple of weeks ago, he was injured, hobbling around holding a bruised rib. he had run into a lamppostjogging bruised rib. he had run into a lamppost jogging round salford quays. 400 sports and survive then the lamppost gets you. can you imagine the health and safety paperwork! when he's not out filming other sports or on the sofa, he‘s filling in health forms. this is
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mike"s new year present. happy new year. see you on the other side. and to you. the british polar explorer ben saunders has been forced to abandon his quest to cross antarctica unassisted, after he was left without enough food to complete his journey. he was undertaking the feat in memory of his friend henry worsley, who died attempting the same journey alone last year. ferocious weather conditions meant ben was forced to cancel the trip when he arrived at the south pole on thursday, after 52 days. we can now speak to ben now. ben, hello. how are you? where are you? hello. i am ben, hello. how are you? where are you? hello. iam very ben, hello. how are you? where are you? hello. i am very well thank you. i‘m sat in a small, i guess you‘d call it a mess tent at a little camp site about 400 metres away from the south post. i‘m at the very bottom of the planet right now. ok. what very bottom of the planet right now. 0k. what happened? 52 days you‘ve
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been trekking in antarctica. you we re been trekking in antarctica. you were determined, we‘ve been following you. you‘ve been really kind and spoke ton us on the programme through various stages of your journey, yet it‘s programme through various stages of yourjourney, yet it‘s come to an end, why? # yes. 52 days. 1,041 kilometres in a straight line. to be honest, worse conditions than i expected. really visibility. i‘ve had nearly one in four days i‘ve been out here has been very cloudy, low fog, which makes navigation hard. i‘ve had a lot of what‘s called strastougie, the ridges in the snow, formed by strong winds. just some very challenging conditions both on the weather front and the terrain as well. were we correct in saying that there was a lack of food basically, which meant you had to take the decision to stop? yes. essentially, distance wise i‘m about two thirds of the way through the entire crossing that i‘d
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planned, and a very similar route to henry planned as well. because i was slow getting here, ifelt henry planned as well. because i was slow getting here, i felt i henry planned as well. because i was slow getting here, ifelt i didn‘t have sufficient food to make it all the way across with a acceptable safety margin. it was a tough decision. because i wasn‘t, i didn‘t arrive here exhausted or starving or anything like that. but ijust felt ididn‘t anything like that. but ijust felt i didn‘t have enough reserve to make it all the way across. what you've done is incredible, it‘s remarkable, so far. no—one‘s going to take that away from you. we‘re mindful that you mention henry, lieutenant colonel worsley was your friend. you promised him you would get home in one piece. absolutely. i think that‘s always been the number one goal in the front of my mind. it was, to me, it was important to follow his foot steps this far. he andi follow his foot steps this far. he and i both started from a place called birknet island. he was here two years ago. i‘m the only person to have walked thatjourney since. that felt special to follow in his foot steps this far. it was a really tough route. if anything, my respect
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and my admiration for henry has only increased many times, seeing how challenging this route is. i've got to ask you, are you up for doing it again, trying again? laughter i spoke to my fiance on the phone yesterday, i may have made some promises that i wouldn‘t come and try again. at the moment, it doesn‘t appeal at all. i think i‘ve, you know, this is my second big trip to antarctica. i think it‘s my 12th or 13th big polar expedition, ifeel content 13th big polar expedition, ifeel co nte nt to 13th big polar expedition, ifeel content to be here, demrad to be finished and excited —— glad to be finished and excited —— glad to be finished and excited for the long journey home. i imagine that we will perhaps see some attempt from you, some record attempt from you in the future? erm...... idon't some record attempt from you in the future? erm...... i don't know. at the moment it doesn‘t appeal. i mean, i hope someone steps up and
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has a go. it‘s a very, very tough camping trip indeed. i was shocked. i‘ve been doing, you know leading expeditions for a long time, 17 yea rs expeditions for a long time, 17 years now. i thought i‘d seen it all when it came to bad ice and bad snow and bad weather conditions, but this was, yeah, genuinelya and bad weather conditions, but this was, yeah, genuinely a very, very tough trip, so far. particularly, there was about 400 kilometres in there was about 400 kilometres in the middle, nearly half of what i‘ve covered has been really difficult terrain. i was surprised by that. at the moment, you know, i‘ve got no wish to get back into a sledge harness again. when will you be back with family and celebrating the new year? yeah, that is a good question. at the moment, i don‘t know where i‘m going to be for the new year. we‘re here at the moment, little camp near the pole. there is a little aircraft with skis on it parked probably about 40 or 50 metres from where i‘m sitting at the moment. but we‘re kind of trapped by the weather. again, it‘s very cloudy. a lot of snow. it‘s quite
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windy. we‘re waiting for a window to fly to the coast of antarctica. from there i will fly to chile and then a long journey to the uk. i think it‘s about 26 hours of flying. so it‘s a long trip. the strange thing is at the moment i‘ve been skiing on uk time you know gmt, where i am now, the camp is on chilean time, three hours‘ difference. about half a mile away is the american base, who are on new zealand time. for them it‘s 10pm at the moment. it‘s 24 hour daylight here. i may end up having two new year‘s eves. i don‘t know. we‘ll see. two new year‘s eves. i don‘t know. we'll see. why not, you deserve it. i‘m sure. thank you for talking to us. we‘re pleased that you‘re safe and sound and do enjoy 2018 with yourfamily when and sound and do enjoy 2018 with your family when you finally get to see them. thank you very much. what a great quy- it was really hard, tough and i
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didn't want to continue jufrt to push it. -- just to push it. seems facetious to talk about our bad weather after that. but matt will give us the uk picture now. it looks quite arctic. not really! come on now. we need to man upa not really! come on now. we need to man up a bit. we‘ve got wintry weather around at the moment. but things are certainly turning milder for many. snow gradually takes a back seat for many of you. winds will take more of a forward seat as we head towards the latter part of the day and into tonight. 0ut there at the moment, we have something wintry in the form of extensive ice across northern and eastern scotland. we see snow as rain is set to push in from the south. that snows over the hills. rain to lower levels. sunshine and showers for northern ireland mid—morning onwards. brightening up in northern england after a drizzly start. ice risk will gradually diminish. sunny spells. lots of sunshine across wales, the midlands and southern
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england. very blustery winds across the south. the winds pick up across the south. the winds pick up across the uk through today to give a blustery afternoon. pushing the hill snow from central scotland into northern scotland for the afternoon. allowing southern scotland, northern ireland to see sunshine and heavy and thundery showers. the odd shower in northern england. much of england and wales is dry. it turns wet towards the south—west by mid—afternoon. temperatures staying in the teens all day long and warming upa in the teens all day long and warming up a bit further north. still chilly in the north—east of scotland. into tonight, rain then sets in across all areas. the ground saturated we could see minor flooding in the south—west and south wales. strong winds developing, uk—wide. lightest winds in northern scotland. as the weather systems works its way in, snow once again to the mountains. temperatures nor most will be —— for most will be clear of frost. in addition to the rain tonight, there‘s the strength of the winds. it‘s courtesy of storm dylan. it will bring severe gales into northern ireland, later in the night. then into the start of new year‘s eve, southern scotland,
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northern england and potentially north wales not just northern england and potentially north wales notjust gales but severe gales. could be damaging gusts of wind. that will cause problems, if you‘re on the move, check before you head out. i‘ll have the forecast tomorrow on breakfast at 6am. strongest of winds in the morning. strong winds almost across the board. 0vernight rain clears for most. it takes into the afternoon to clear parts of scotland. we‘ll see snow. sunshine for the afternoon on new year‘s eve. then lots of showers in the west. some of these heavy with hail and thunder. temperatures again notfaroff with hail and thunder. temperatures again not far off today‘s values. holding up in double figures in the south. that does mean it won‘t be desperately chilly into the end of 2017. the wind pushes showers across most areas. these are the temperatures as we ring in the new year. ranging between two and eight degrees. take something water proof with you, just about anyone can see a shower into the start of 2018. potential of a risk of more persistent rain clipping the south and south—east as we go into new year‘s day. that clears through. sunshine comes out. then showers into the north and the west. whilst
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many sees sunshine on new year‘s day, it feels cooler again. nowhere near as cold and wintry as it has been across the other portion of the atlantic. lots of snow in upstate new york, almost six foot in some places the other day. it‘s been an icy wind chill with it. if you know anybody in toronto, quebec or new york, i hope they‘ve got something warm. temperatures in toronto and quebec as midnight strikes will be closer to that of a domestic fridge freezer. back to you both. celebrate indoors. matt, have a lovely new year. you too, enjoy. for millions of viewers recently sunday night has meant only one thing blue planet ii. the team behind the show is celebrating 60 years of bringing wildlife from some of the most remote locations on earth into our living rooms. breakfast‘sjohn maguire has been looking through the archives. i spend several days wandering around the station,
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looking for animals. then one day, i was lucky. it is 1957, and a youthful david attenborough is in the rainforest of what is now papua new guinea, in search of new species. these were pioneers, going to places where very few people had gone into, taking filming equipment to record it, and going on proper adventures. colinjackson is one of the natural history unit‘s most experienced producers. he says these seminal days of the nhu and the exploits of david attenborough were revolutionary. he used to ask the bbc for a large chunk of money and he would go off and film for months. he was getting these amazing stories, these amazing adventures, and he would come back three months later and it would all be in the bag, and nobody would have heard from him, apart from the occasional letter, because that was the only way back then. i could see they were parrots, but i wasn't sure what kind... the unit was officially formed in bristol in 1957, although radio had been covering wildlife for more than ten
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years by then. for the first time, what had always been the preserve of amateur cameramen was showcased on the fledgeling medium of television. here are the pelicans, here we are filming them. now, let's watch the dive. this is the naturalist peter scott, exploring the caribbean. this time in slow motion. as we open these things up, this goes back decades, there are rows and rows like this. some of these were shot decades ago, some more recently. over the decades the planet has changed hugely, but the man who runs the unit today says its ethos remains the same. everything about what we do now is the same as it was then. it is about trying to get close to something. we are seeing what technology is available, how we can innovate that technology, how we can get our audiences even closer to the natural world. you know, to liberate those stories that science is pointing us towards. at this time, the mother develops a pouch beneath
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her chin, which will hold about seven eggs or young. as technology advanced, the nhu was able to bring the vivid colours of the natural world into our living rooms. technology is a wonderful enabler, but without the passion, without understanding how the wildlife is getting on and how we can go about filming that, that‘s what the power is, people‘s imagination, people thinking they want to share this with the rest of the world, and discovering little things. blue planet, discovering behaviours even science hadn‘t seen before. but what will future projects find? the next 60 years will be all about the big stories around our relationship with the natural world, species lost, abundance lost, and the kind of footprint of human kind on the world, but also the heroes that are bringing it back, because we have to bring it back. a sobering tale, perhaps, but one the nhu is determined to keep on telling. lovely pictures. have you got any
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u nwa nted gifts, lovely pictures. have you got any unwanted gifts, perhaps you received them this christmas, you don‘t want them this christmas, you don‘t want them now, don‘t know what to do with them? hollie gregersen is a lifestyle blogger who calls herself the thrifty mum. people are agonising over this, any tips? yeah, i write thrift mum.com, my blog, particularly for parents, this time of year is a nightmare. there‘s packaging and wrapping everywhere. if you are going to regift, make sure all the pieces are there. i made that mistake this year. i won‘t do that again. if you wa nt to year. i won‘t do that again. if you want to resell, consider keeping it wrapped and putting it on an online auction. nobody can see what you‘re selling, so the person that‘s given you it doesn‘t know. selling, so the person that‘s given you it doesn't know. a few people have been in touch this morning, among many, saying, this is all a bit ungrateful. shouldn‘t we take what we‘re girve and enjoy it, even if we don‘t like it? what we‘re girve and enjoy it, even if we don't like it? it depends on the reason why it‘s unwanted. if you actually need the money, then selling on is a valid reason. if
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you‘ve got duplicates giving it to charity is a really nice thing to do as well. it‘s not about being ungrateful. see it as an asset and it‘s yours to do what you want with it. how do you make sure you don't reg ift it. how do you make sure you don't regift to someone who gave it to you in the first place? personally i like to make a note and stick that to it. i have a christmas box that i put presents in that i will spread throughout the year for birthdays and things. that‘s a good idea. swishing, you talk about that, what is it? that's an organised swap-it session. you could do it in the office, or down your local pub or have a session in your home. invite people along to bring what they don‘t want, any unwanted gifts or clothes that are having a declutter, because you have new things. then have a swapping session. there you go. unless the people who gave you the present are at the party. that could be awkward. thank you, holly. we‘ve got unopened presents back here. they're all yours. from you? yeah. liar! have a lovely new year. roger is with you tomorrow from 6am. have a great day, bye—bye. shall we
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get them? yeah. this is bbc news. i‘m shaun ley. the headlines at 10:00am. a beatle, a bee gee and a ballerina. ringo starr and barry gibb are knighted in the new year honours. strictly judge darcey bussell is made a dame. the labour peer lord adonis, who‘s quit as the government‘s infrastructure adviser, claims brexit is infecting the entire conduct of government. and one of the really depressing things about the government at the moment, which i think is unfortunately a reflection of the brexit malaise which is sweeping whitehall. is the government has become hyper—sensitive to any criticism. thousands of iranians take to the streets of tehran in a show of support for the government after two days of opposition protests. millennials will enjoy the biggest "inheritance boom" of any post—war generation, but not until they‘re into their 605, a report says. also in the next hour...
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